Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 3

In the previous two posts, we considered some questions that we need to ask and answer before selecting a PA. Once we have an idea of what we’re trying to accomplish, what our design criteria are and how we can implement that design, we still have a few more choices to make. I told you this wasn’t an easy process!

Powered or Unpowered?

A decade ago, an audio amplifier was big, heavy and required a lot of current to work well. Today, even powerful amplifiers can fit into small spaces and don’t weigh nearly as much. As a result, more manufacturers are opting to include them in their speaker systems. There are some significant benefits to this approach. First, the amplifiers can be exactly matched to the speakers. Since the amp is in the box, cable runs are incredibly short, which means nearly 100% of the amp’s power is deliver to the speaker, not turned into heat in the cable. Crossover points between drivers can be optimally set, and often DSP included in the box, which makes for a far more predictable system. 

The downside is that if an amp goes on a speaker that is 50 feet in the air, someone has to go up and change it. You also have to supply power to your powered speakers, which means double the number of cables running to each box. And the inclusion of amps also means the powered speakers will be slightly heavier than their unpowered brethren. This is not typically a problem, but it has to be considered. 

Which is better? Like all things in audio, that depends. Often times, powered speakers are an excellent choice as many of the tuning decisions have been optimized at the factory, which means it should take less time getting them sounding great in the field. On the other hand, if your installer wants to do something rather custom to accommodate a specific situation, sometimes the added control of separate components is better. The availability of power and space for amps also factor into the decision. 

Thankfully, there are excellent choices in both powered and unpowered varieties and it’s not uncommon to see the same speaker available in both powered and unpowered versions.

Line Array or Point Source?

Line arrays—multiple identical boxes hung close together in a vertical line—are all the rage right now. And to be sure, they solve a lot of problems in certain situations. They typically boast good pattern control, are very efficient and are easy to rig; characteristics that make them excellent choices for large venues. Nearly every large tour is using line arrays right now for those (and other) reasons. They are not the right choice for every venue, however. 

Smaller rooms (under 500) will often be better served with a more traditional point source box. In small rooms, it’s difficult to hang a long enough array to achieve good pattern control, and they get very expensive very quickly when compared to a point source system. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that since line arrays are “new technology” they are inherently better. There has been a lot of development going on in both types, and modern point source systems can be incredibly effective when designed well.

A relatively new type of system is emerging as a great problem solver for certain rooms; the digitally steerable array. Using a larger number of small drivers and a bunch of digital signal processing (DSP), these systems can be life-savers for problematic rooms. A digitally steerable array can vary it’s coverage both vertically and horizontally to keep sound going where the people are and away from where they are not. Because they typically use a bunch of small drivers, their footprint is small making them ideal for very traditional rooms where aesthetics are a big deal.

Get a Listen

If it’s at all possible, you want to listen to the speakers before buying. Ideally, you would be able to hear them in your space. This may not always be possible, or it may not be free. You may have to spend some money to rent the speakers, or at least pay for a demo. If you’re looking at a smaller system, the local rep may have some boxes he can bring by. You may not get a whole system, but you’ll get a good idea of whether these speakers will work for you or not. Having a set of tracks of your band using virtual soundcheck is a terrific way to audition the speakers. If you can’t arrange for the speakers in your room, try to visit a venue that has them. This is less ideal, but will give you a good idea of what they sound like.

Conclusion

Which type of speaker to buy comes down not to selecting the “best” speaker, but rather the best speaker system for the room. Thankfully, the science of speaker design has evolved to a point where we can accurately predict performance before hanging boxes. Being able to try out different models inside the computer is a great aid to developing a great sounding system. What speakers you select will vary depending on the room, style of service and what environment you are trying to create. There are plenty of options out there, so with proper research and a good design, the end result will be a system that meets the needs for your church.

“Gear

Today's post is brought to you by DiGiCo. DiGiCo audio mixing consoles deliver solutions that provide extreme flexibility, are easy to use and have an expandable infrastructure, while still providing the best possible audio quality. Visit their website to learn more.

Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 2

Photo courtesy of Tim Geers

Photo courtesy of Tim Geers

This is part 2 in our series on selecting speakers. As I said last time, deciding which speakers to buy for your church can be a daunting task. It’s typically an expensive decision, and a really expensive one if you choose poorly. It’s important to not simply buy the first set you year, or decide on a system based on a magazine review. Even hearing them in another building may not be a good indicator of how they’ll do in your building. So here are some more questions to consider. 

What is the Vibe?

This goes along with the source; are we looking for quiet and contemplative or loud and energetic? Do we simply want to reinforce some acoustic sounds so they can be heard in the back of the room, or do we want to put the sound right in your face? Even in the extremes, we have options. For example, if we’re going for more of a concert feel, what genre do we wish to emulate? Some PA’s will deliver a very edgy, rock ’n’ roll sound, while others are more hi-fi. Knowing what vibe you want to create will begin to dictate the system you ultimately install. 

What is the Environment?

Churches run the gamut from acoustically live, highly reflective cathedral type rooms, to dampened and treated theatrical venues. Like everything else, the environment will effect the choice of speakers. Highly reverberant rooms will require speakers that have excellent pattern control to keep sound from bouncing off the walls, ceilings and floors. Very dead rooms will require more speakers to energize the space and overcome all the absorption.

There is also the issue of aesthetics. Many congregants would object to a modern, black flown line array in a historic cathedral. In such a room, a smaller, less visually intrusive system is required. Even in modern churches, sight lines, trim heights and other architectural features will dictate one speaker type or another. Make sure your integrator is asking these questions. 

Can We Hang ‘em High?

Some rooms make it easy to hang—or fly—speakers. In others, it’s impossible. In still others, it’s impractical or not necessary. Before you get your heart set on 600 pounds of beautiful, flown, line array, make sure the roof structure can actually support it. And yes, it’s possible your roof cannot support that much weight. In more traditional venues, wall or column mounted speakers are often the best choice as they can blend into the architecture rather easily (especially if they can be custom painted). In some smaller, multi-purpose rooms, portable speakers on sticks might be the best option. 

Can We Afford Them?

Speaker systems can range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars for small rooms; from ten- to fifty-thousand for medium rooms and upwards of a hundred thousand to almost a million dollars for very large rooms. In those vast categories are all kinds of variations. Some well-known manufacturers are very good, and rather expensive. Other lesser-known companies can be almost as good and considerably more affordable. Not everyone needs or can afford a Mercedes; quite often, we can get by quite nicely with an Infinity or even a Nissan. 

Just be sure to buy enough PA for your room. Too many churches buy on budget and end up unhappy with the results. Build in some headroom; make sure the system can go louder than you need it to so you’re not pushing it to the edge every weekend. 

Those are some general questions and parameters you should be considering before beginning to hone in on your speaker selection. Now that we have that established, next time, we’ll consider some of the categories and sub-categories of speaker systems. 

Roland

Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 1

Photo courtesy of Larry Jacobsen

Photo courtesy of Larry Jacobsen

Buying loudspeakers is perhaps the most daunting task a church tech will face. Today we have powered and unpowered speakers; line arrays and point source boxes; flown and ground stacked; cheap and eye-watering expensive. In each of those categories, we have dozens of manufacturers with hundreds of models to choose from. While it’s not possible in the space of this article to tell you what to buy, we will attempt to guide you through the process of selecting the proper speakers for your space.

The Perfect Speaker

First, there is no perfect speaker. All speaker designs make compromises in deference to the laws of physics. The right speaker for one room might well be entirely the wrong speaker for another room. Don’t get sucked into the trap of thinking that the speakers in the church that put on that big conference are the right speakers for you. They may be, but they also may not be. 

Second, once you get beyond putting up one or two speakers in a small room, I believe there needs to be some design involved. A competent integrator should be able to model the room and show you some options based on prediction software and help narrow down your choices. Far too many churches make the mistake of just hanging some boxes in the room, pointing them wherever and hoping it sounds good. From experience, I can tell you that most of the time it doesn’t. Plan on spending at least some of your speaker budget on an actual design. You can thank me later. 

As I said, there is no “best” speaker. What you want is the right speakers for your environment. To get to that right speaker, we have to ask some questions, and determine what we are trying to accomplish. Once we know the intended result, we can begin selecting speakers that will effectively deliver the results. It’s much like buying a vehicle; you wouldn’t buy a two-seater convertible if you intend to haul around a lot of mulch. Then again, a pickup would probably not be the best choice to drive a large family to baseball practice. With that in mind, let’s ask some questions.

What is the Source?

Believe it or not, the requirements for a speaker system that will deliver primarily the spoken word and one that will engage the audience with concert-level sound are quite different. Different churches have vastly different programming styles, and the PA needs change as we consider those styles. 

In a very traditional, liturgical setting, the speaker system really just needs to deliver the frequency spectrum of the human voice evenly throughout the room and with great clarity. The volume levels don’t need to be that high (relatively speaking), so we don’t need a bunch of drivers in the air. Don’t be fooled, however; getting a system like this to sound good requires some careful design. It’s just not likely to be as expensive as a full-on modern service system.

As amplified music becomes more and more of a priority, the system needs to adjust. Some churches want concert-level audio, and the only way to get that is with a big PA. Even in smaller rooms, you’ll need to move a lot of air, and that requires a good number of full-range speakers, as well as low frequency drivers (sub woofers) to deliver the goods. Most churches fall somewhere in between those extremes and will need a system designed accordingly.

This is the first in a series of questions we have to ask when it comes to selecting speakers for a venue. Next time, we’ll delve into a little more detail.

“Gear

It May Not Be Too Loud

Photo courtesy of Eliazar Parra Cardenas

Photo courtesy of Eliazar Parra Cardenas

It’s been a while since we’ve discussed everyone’s favorite live sound topic in the church; volume! Almost nothing will get people fired up more than trying to figure out how loud to run a service. If you ask 10 people in the congregation, you’re liable to get 11 answers. When I was a TD regularly mixing, I would get complaints from some people that it was too loud and from others that it wasn’t loud enough. And that was for the same service. The reality is, it will be almost impossible to please everyone in the congregation when it comes to volume. However, there are some things that we need to know before we even enter into the conversation. 

It May Be a Style Thing

A service mixed at 85 dBA SPL 10 second average may be too loud for someone if they don’t like Hillsong-style worship music. But that same person may have no problem with a pipe organ cranking away at 105 dBA SPL 10 second average. Some people see guitars on stage and say, “It’s too loud!” even if the guitars aren’t playing. Before you get into a heated argument about actual level, make sure you’re really talking about volume. 

It May Be a Mix Balance Thing

I’m an old guy now, but I still like music reasonably loud for worship. However, I’m not digging the current trend to make the kick and bass the lead vocal. I’ve heard several mixes—if they can be called mixes—where pretty much all I could hear (and feel) was the kick and bass. No vocals, no guitar, no keys, no anything else. And the low end was flappy and all over the place anyway. But for some reason, that’s how the guy mixed it. In all of those cases, the mix was too loud for me. It was just plain unpleasant to listen to. I really wouldn’t have mattered if it was 100 dB or 85 dB. 

I’ve also heard a few rooms where the system was tuned with so much energy in the 1-4 KHz range that it felt like an ice pick to the forehead. Again, it doesn’t really matter what level we’re talking about at that point, it’s too loud. This is where an RTA can be really helpful to see what’s going on in the room. If you see a big hump in the middle of the frequency range, you need to fix that because you’re going to get complaints. 

At that point, you have to figure out if it’s your mix or system tuning. But either way, you need to fix it.

It May Be a Acoustic Instrument Thing

Live drums are generally pretty loud. When churches put a full drum kit on a stage in a small room with all hard surfaces, the drums are going to be loud. In fact, they will probably louder than you want without even putting them in the PA. And you can’t turn them down at that point. I’m not going to go into how to solve that problem here (we’ve talked about that already—search for it), but those cymbals can be a chief source of complaints. Similarly, if you have guitar amps or bass amps on stage, they can often overpower the PA if the musicians aren’t disciplined. 

In this case, it actually is too loud. If you have to run the level of the mix higher than you ordinarily would just to make it work with the drums or guitars on stage, you have some work to do. Floor wedges can present a similar challenge. When I arrived at Coast Hills, when I turned off the main PA and measured just the stage wash, we were at about 86-88 dBA at FOH 90 feet away. At that time, our volume limit was 88 dB at FOH. I was pretty much done, so I went home. 

No, I didn’t go home, but you can see the challenge. It took a lot of energy, time and no small amount of money to fix that issue. But we did. 

The point of this article is to get you thinking about volume in a different way. It’s a much more nuanced problem than just what the Radio Shack SPL meter says. Or worse, the uncalibrated SPL app that everyone has on their phone. And by the way, the next time someone walks up, phone in hand telling you how loud it is, just ask them when the last time they calibrated their phone to an industry standard reference calibration. Then show them the calibration page and ask them where their calibration source is. That usually settles them down. 

Before you go getting into an argument about how loud it is, make sure you identify the real problem. What’s your favorite volume-related issue?

Roland

Today's post is brought to you by Heil Sound. Established in 1966, Heil Sound Ltd. has developed many professional audio innovations over the years, and is currently a world leader in the design and manufacture of large diaphragm dynamic, professional grade microphones for live sound, broadcast and recording.