On Working with Great Staff and a Day Off

I work for a great church. I know, I've only actually worked there for 5 days now, but it's a great staff. Really, I feel very blessed to be here. These are people you want to work with. Tonight we had some real challenges, technically speaking. We lost control of the lights for most of the services (despite a lot of on-the-fly troubleshooting during and between services), and they just sort of did their own thing. Changing colors, turning on and off, all at random intervals. There was a lot of talk on the Clear-Com, but it was all handled well. The good news is I now have my first project to work on this week.

Which brings me to my next topic, my day off. Today is Sunday. I was off yesterday and I'll be off tomorrow. Though this is my first week here, I can tell you it's the greatest gift I've ever been given as a church techie. Knowing that I don't have to go to work tomorrow after a long and somewhat stressful day is just amazing.

If you're reading this blog, you probably go all-out every weekend for your services. Doing that takes a lot out of you. Even when you enjoy it, it's draining. I love doing services, I love the technology, the people and seeing God move. But I also really like to have time off to recharge. Tomorrow I get that. Tuesday when I go in, I'll be fired up and ready to go. I'll get more work done in 4 days than I ever did in 5. All churches should consider this, especially for their production staff. Seriously.

It became a reality this week that the technical infrastructure of our church building is a disaster. I'm trying to be kind, but it's really a mess. Video, lighting and even sound is just messed up. I look at it and think, "This is not how we do things!" So I have a long road ahead of me to sort it all out. But that's what I do, and it's why I was hired. The good news is, the leadership is behind me (well they say they are, we'll verify that in a few months!). Thankfully, our volunteers are troopers and will help me drive the bus to the land of improvement.

I've said it before, if you want your volunteers to do a job well, give them the tools they need to do it. Get the details right and make sure someone has thought through the whole system and come up with a unified plan. Make it right, and the team will amaze you. I have a lot more to say, but it's late and I need some rest. I'll be chronicling my quest for a unified, holistic media/technology strategy here over the next few months. Stay tuned!