Presentation Cuing--Fast Songs

This is a topic that I feel pretty strongly about. Know that up front. How many times have you been in a worship service, singing a new song, and been unable to sing it because the lyrics on the screen trail the worship leader? Even if it's a song you sort of know, it is really hard to sing along if the lyrics are not keeping up. Don't believe me? Check it out...

This is a clip from the David Crowder song "Undignified" (I didn't ask him if I could use it, so don't tell him, OK? But if you find out, David, know that I have purchased all your CDs. Nothing but love here!). I have cued the lyrics the way I see a lot of people cue them. Now, even if you've sung this song at the top of your lungs in your car as much as I have (which is to say, a lot...), try to sing the song the way the lyrics are coming up on the screen--just as you would in church with a song you don't know well. See how it goes.




That wasn't too easy, now was it? The problem is simple: By the time the 1/2 second dissolve takes place, and our eyes scan back up to the first word on the new slide, he's already onto the second line. That means we sing in fits and starts, and it's awkward and uncomfortable. After a while, people stop singing altogether.

So how do we fix it? The answer is twofold. First, for songs this fast, I change the dissolve setting to .3 seconds (sometimes even .2). That gets the new slide up faster. Second, I cue earlier--typically in the space between the second to last and last word on the slide.

Take a look at this version and see how much easier it is to sing along with.



Here's something that we often forget: People read a lot faster than they talk (or sing). Within a few seconds of a lyric slide hitting the screen, the audience has already read it. That's why we can change to the next one before they've finished singing--they've already read it. By cuing the song a little early, it gives the singer a chance to get the upcoming words "in que" if you will before they need them.

Since it might be hard to see exactly when I cued those slides, I have a third version here with yellow arrows on the cue points. If I were running ProPresenter, I would hit the spacebar when we got to the arrows. Take a look.



I should also point out that in the second and third version, the first lyric slide hits the screen before David starts singing. This is important. We need to give people a second or two to get the words cued up. This can be accomplished by either A) knowing the song and arragement very well (ie. there are 8 bars of instrumental between the chorus and verse--and you know how to cound bars), or B) watching the worship leaer. Most will give a pretty clear signal that they're getting ready to sing in a second, you just need to watch for it.

Another thing to notice that I treat two short, fast words (ie. my king) as one word and cue at the beginning of "my," instead of "king." The reason is simple; "my king" is sung as myking. If you wait until you get to "king," you'll be too late. When the song has a phrase break in it, such as between "nothing Lord is hindering this passion and my soul," {breath} "And I'll become..." you have a little more leeway in cuing. With those types of phrases, you can make the slide change happen during the breath.

Next time around, we'll tackle an approach to a slower song, and learn how to cue slides in a musical and seamless manner.