Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 1

Photo courtesy of Larry Jacobsen

Photo courtesy of Larry Jacobsen

Buying loudspeakers is perhaps the most daunting task a church tech will face. Today we have powered and unpowered speakers; line arrays and point source boxes; flown and ground stacked; cheap and eye-watering expensive. In each of those categories, we have dozens of manufacturers with hundreds of models to choose from. While it’s not possible in the space of this article to tell you what to buy, we will attempt to guide you through the process of selecting the proper speakers for your space.

The Perfect Speaker

First, there is no perfect speaker. All speaker designs make compromises in deference to the laws of physics. The right speaker for one room might well be entirely the wrong speaker for another room. Don’t get sucked into the trap of thinking that the speakers in the church that put on that big conference are the right speakers for you. They may be, but they also may not be. 

Second, once you get beyond putting up one or two speakers in a small room, I believe there needs to be some design involved. A competent integrator should be able to model the room and show you some options based on prediction software and help narrow down your choices. Far too many churches make the mistake of just hanging some boxes in the room, pointing them wherever and hoping it sounds good. From experience, I can tell you that most of the time it doesn’t. Plan on spending at least some of your speaker budget on an actual design. You can thank me later. 

As I said, there is no “best” speaker. What you want is the right speakers for your environment. To get to that right speaker, we have to ask some questions, and determine what we are trying to accomplish. Once we know the intended result, we can begin selecting speakers that will effectively deliver the results. It’s much like buying a vehicle; you wouldn’t buy a two-seater convertible if you intend to haul around a lot of mulch. Then again, a pickup would probably not be the best choice to drive a large family to baseball practice. With that in mind, let’s ask some questions.

What is the Source?

Believe it or not, the requirements for a speaker system that will deliver primarily the spoken word and one that will engage the audience with concert-level sound are quite different. Different churches have vastly different programming styles, and the PA needs change as we consider those styles. 

In a very traditional, liturgical setting, the speaker system really just needs to deliver the frequency spectrum of the human voice evenly throughout the room and with great clarity. The volume levels don’t need to be that high (relatively speaking), so we don’t need a bunch of drivers in the air. Don’t be fooled, however; getting a system like this to sound good requires some careful design. It’s just not likely to be as expensive as a full-on modern service system.

As amplified music becomes more and more of a priority, the system needs to adjust. Some churches want concert-level audio, and the only way to get that is with a big PA. Even in smaller rooms, you’ll need to move a lot of air, and that requires a good number of full-range speakers, as well as low frequency drivers (sub woofers) to deliver the goods. Most churches fall somewhere in between those extremes and will need a system designed accordingly.

This is the first in a series of questions we have to ask when it comes to selecting speakers for a venue. Next time, we’ll delve into a little more detail.

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