Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 2

Photo courtesy of Tim Geers

Photo courtesy of Tim Geers

This is part 2 in our series on selecting speakers. As I said last time, deciding which speakers to buy for your church can be a daunting task. It’s typically an expensive decision, and a really expensive one if you choose poorly. It’s important to not simply buy the first set you year, or decide on a system based on a magazine review. Even hearing them in another building may not be a good indicator of how they’ll do in your building. So here are some more questions to consider. 

What is the Vibe?

This goes along with the source; are we looking for quiet and contemplative or loud and energetic? Do we simply want to reinforce some acoustic sounds so they can be heard in the back of the room, or do we want to put the sound right in your face? Even in the extremes, we have options. For example, if we’re going for more of a concert feel, what genre do we wish to emulate? Some PA’s will deliver a very edgy, rock ’n’ roll sound, while others are more hi-fi. Knowing what vibe you want to create will begin to dictate the system you ultimately install. 

What is the Environment?

Churches run the gamut from acoustically live, highly reflective cathedral type rooms, to dampened and treated theatrical venues. Like everything else, the environment will effect the choice of speakers. Highly reverberant rooms will require speakers that have excellent pattern control to keep sound from bouncing off the walls, ceilings and floors. Very dead rooms will require more speakers to energize the space and overcome all the absorption.

There is also the issue of aesthetics. Many congregants would object to a modern, black flown line array in a historic cathedral. In such a room, a smaller, less visually intrusive system is required. Even in modern churches, sight lines, trim heights and other architectural features will dictate one speaker type or another. Make sure your integrator is asking these questions. 

Can We Hang ‘em High?

Some rooms make it easy to hang—or fly—speakers. In others, it’s impossible. In still others, it’s impractical or not necessary. Before you get your heart set on 600 pounds of beautiful, flown, line array, make sure the roof structure can actually support it. And yes, it’s possible your roof cannot support that much weight. In more traditional venues, wall or column mounted speakers are often the best choice as they can blend into the architecture rather easily (especially if they can be custom painted). In some smaller, multi-purpose rooms, portable speakers on sticks might be the best option. 

Can We Afford Them?

Speaker systems can range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars for small rooms; from ten- to fifty-thousand for medium rooms and upwards of a hundred thousand to almost a million dollars for very large rooms. In those vast categories are all kinds of variations. Some well-known manufacturers are very good, and rather expensive. Other lesser-known companies can be almost as good and considerably more affordable. Not everyone needs or can afford a Mercedes; quite often, we can get by quite nicely with an Infinity or even a Nissan. 

Just be sure to buy enough PA for your room. Too many churches buy on budget and end up unhappy with the results. Build in some headroom; make sure the system can go louder than you need it to so you’re not pushing it to the edge every weekend. 

Those are some general questions and parameters you should be considering before beginning to hone in on your speaker selection. Now that we have that established, next time, we’ll consider some of the categories and sub-categories of speaker systems. 

Roland