CTA Review: Digital Audio Labs Livemix Pt. 4

This is our final installment of the Livemix system from Digital Audio Labs. We’ve taken an overview look, dug into the system components, looked at some features and today we’ll wrap it up with the remaining unique features and a conclusion. 

On the Beat

The Livemix also includes a built-in metronome. One person can configure it and trigger the start stop while all others have individual volume control. Actually, anyone on the network can run it, but I suggest leaving it in one person’s hands. 

Load and Save

It’s easy to save and later load mix settings. If you have some musicians who rotate in and out, they could save their presets and quickly load them back up. The presets are global, so it doesn’t matter which mixer they get when you set up. You can also load and save presets from Mirror Mix mode, which means if you have a mixer at FOH, you could quickly configure everyone’s mixer during the week without leaving the booth.

 What’s Not to Like?

As I said at the beginning of this, I really like this system. Overall, it’s very solid, and I’m sure I will be recommending them often. There are a few things I’m not crazy about, however. First, like the dreaded Aviom, when the system first boots up, all the channels are at half volume. I understand the reasoning for this, but it is a bad idea. Most people forget the volume knob also goes down, and as they try to build a mix, they will end up with all channels at full, not being able to hear anything.

I would use one of the presets to turn all channels off, except for the talkback. It would be easy enough to use Mirror Mix to turn up each person’s channel(s) before rehearsal starts so they at least hear themselves. But let them start at 0 for everything else. 

Second, while the dual mixer concept is great for many situations (and they’re really not even that expensive at $525 or so…) You’re going to have a lot more “mixers” on stage than needed. At my last church, we could have gotten away with two units for the front line—the worship leader could have shared with a BGV and the other two BGVs could easily share. But while drums and bass were right next to each other, the way the platforms were set it would have been a pain to try to share a mixer. Same with keys and perc/winds. So we would have ended up buying individual mixers for each and not using one side.

I guess the other way to look at that is you end up with more capacity for bigger events. In those cases, people just have to learn how to work together, even if it’s a bit inconvenient. With eight duo’s on stage, having 16 mixes is a nice bonus. Still, I’d love to see a single unit at some point. And while the mixers are not that expensive, the input module is (about $1000) and the Dante card will set you back another $800-900. Still, you only need one, so overall the system price is very competitive. 

The Bottom Line

The system sounds great, has a ton of features and is easy to use. I didn’t even really get into the touch screen functionality or how fast and easy it is to build a mix. If you’re interested, download the manual and read it. It’s actually well written and illustrated and gives you a great way to understand the feature set. With the analog input module, this is a good system. With Dante, it’s really good. I can see using a lot of these.

Roland

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