Backing Up Production Machines

Photo courtesy of Jaymis Loveday

Photo courtesy of Jaymis Loveday

Last time we talked about my thoughts on upgrading (or not upgrading) your production machines. Today, I’m going to talk about creating a safety net for them. Again, these are lessons I’ve learned over 25+ years of managing mission critical systems, so learn from my mistakes. 

Maintain a Current Clone of Your Drives

Hard drives will fail. Usually at the worst time. Like Palm Sunday morning. Yeah, that happened. Even SSDs, which are proving to be pretty dang reliable, will fail at some point. The only way to get back up and running quickly is with a full image backup. For all my mission critical production machines, I had a small hard drive with a full, bootable clone backup on it. I used to have several to manage, but after a while, I just bought a 1 TB pocket drive and partitioned it to back up 2-3 machines on one drive.

On the Mac, you can use a program like Super Duper for my favorite, Carbon Copy Cloner to keep an exact copy of the drive. On Windows, you can use Ghost or a similar program. If the main drive fails, or an upgrade breaks stuff, you can boot from the backup, and effectively unwind time. Any time I made significant changes to the machine, I would update the clone, but only after I verified the changes worked properly. If an update went south, we broke out the backup and rolled it back. 

For those of use that find Macs make better PCs than PCs do and need to backup your Bootcamp partitions, my IT guy told me about a cool program called WinClone. To use it, boot into the Mac OS, and run WinClone. It will compress and clone your Windows “drive” and save it as a file to another drive. Should Windows go south, you can simply restore the Windows drive and it will be like nothing never happened.

This is great for the OS and applications, but you can easily lose files like ProPresenter songs, for example. But I have a solution for that, too.

Use Dropbox for Libraries.

I set up a Dropbox account for my important show files. I wrote a full guide to this in an article called Back It Up: Presentation, but the gist is that you store (or maintain a cloned copy) of your show files, songs, templates and maybe media in a Dropbox folder that is automatically updated to the cloud. If you have to blow the drive out and restore from a clone, Dropbox will put your library files back. I don’t think I would ever run a production machine without Dropbox.

Maintain Incremental Backups

I really like Time Machine, especially lately. It’s a lot lower overhead than it once was and can really save your bacon if you delete or mess up a file. But, don’t run Time Machine backups during the service. Time Machine can be processor and disk intensive, and it’s highly possible that it will mess up your media playback. I prefer to keep Time Machine on an external drive so I can simply leave the drive turned off during the service. If you simply must have it on an internal drive, use Time Machine Scheduler to avoid service times. But honestly, an external drive is easier. Time Machine won’t even try to back up if the drive isn’t there, so it’s foolproof.

Clone Before Updating

Before we upgraded our production machines to a new OS, I went through and cloned all the drives. I did this so we could go back if something didn’t work. It’s a whole lot easier to simply restore the clone than it is to downgrade the OS, then Time Machine everything back. When it comes to upgrading, clones are your best friend. And honestly, drives are cheap enough now, you can easily maintain several versions of the clone if you want. Do one right before you update, then one right after. Small pocket drives from WD and Seagate are perfect for this task. At under $100 each, you can afford to have several for each machine. 

Hopefully this has helpful for you. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to update some of my backups…

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