Lousy Church Sound--Another Perspective, Pt. 1

A few weeks ago I came across an old post at another blog that described a trend, lousy church sound. You can read the post here. I’ll warn you, there are a lot of things going on in that post, and it may take you a few passes through to get a handle on what he’s saying (I’ve read it 5 times and I’m still not 100% sure…).

My intention is not to attack the author of that post, as I believe he makes some good points. He makes some statements that I think are worth unpacking here. As I said, there’s a lot going on there, so it will probably take me a few posts to work through it. I’ve broken the post down to three main prepositions that we’ll tackle one at a time. 

Preposition One: Pro-Level Sound Requires Professionals

One statement he makes that I am in general agreement with is this:

They [churches] haven’t yet realized they can’t invest in pro equipment without hiring a pro to run it.

I’ve been saying this for quite a while now. I have seen this happen at quite a few churches. They start off as a small church in a small room with simple, analog equipment that the volunteers figure out fairly well. As they grow, they build a new building and install a fancy new digital console and no one knows how to use it. What the church needs is a technical director who can train the volunteers on the new gear and keep it running smoothly. Sadly most churches discover this too late. There are a couple reasons for this failure.

Church Leaders Don’t Realize How Complex Technology Is

Marketers tell church leaders that all they have to do is buy the latest digital console and all their problems will go away. This leads them to tell their integrator they want to go digital. The smart integrator will talk about the need for training for the team, but in the interest of saving money (which is generally needed because the church is trying to build a bigger church than they can actually afford), the training gets cut from the budget. 

After the grand opening, when the integrator has gone home, the volunteers stare at the new console like deer in the headlights and things go downhill from there. The reality is, digital audio consoles are complex devices, and they require someone who knows how to run them properly to set them up. Some are easier than others, but all are complicated. Without training and support, the team is set up to fail. 

It Always Comes Down To People

I am always amused that churches are more than willing to pay a healthy salary for a worship leader, and will put him or her on the leadership team of the church. At the same time, churches will often expect volunteers with no training, support or guidance to manage an incredibly complex AVL system. If they do finally see the need to hire a TD, they will often want a part-time person or will only pay slightly more than minimum wage. 

In fact, the guy behind the console is just as important to the overall sound and worship experience as the person on stage. If one is worth a reasonable salary and status, so is the other. Neither will do well without the other. 

If you lead a church that is going into a building project that will include a whole new technology system and you don’t have the hiring of a technical director on your radar, you need to get on that. I can pretty much promise you will be disappointed if you don’t. 

At this point, you might think I’m down on volunteers. In fact, the author of the original article implied that volunteers cannot possibly ever run a complex digital console. However, I disagree. And we’ll get to that next time.

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