Church Tech Budgets--End of Life

Not that end of life. Photo courtesy of Ken Mayer

Not that end of life. Photo courtesy of Ken Mayer

As we reach end of life, I think we’re reaching the end of this series. Again, I’m talking the lifespan of equipment, not tech directors. Last time, I made the distinction between capital expenses and budgeted expenses. One of the keys to staying on top of capital expenses is to have an end of life plan.

Every piece of equipment has a fixed lifespan; stuff just doesn’t last forever. That means that even the nice, shiny new equipment I’m putting in today will need to be replaced. And I’m not sure anyone ever considers that.

See, I think most churches look at A/V/L equipment as a one-time capital expense. They buy all the stuff they need once, and forget about it for a long, long time. At least until it breaks. At which point there is a sense of panic and urgency to get it fixed or replaced. 

When I was at Coast Hills, I decided fairly early on to run some end of life projections. The rationale was simple; I knew there was a lot of outdated gear to replace right now, but there was a significant amount of equipment that would needing replacement in about3-4 years. And when you start looking at the numbers, it wasn’t chump change. Take a look:

As you can see, we’re talking some serious dollars. Now, I’m just considering major systems; that is systems that have a price tag over $10,000. I figure the smaller stuff will just get rolled into the normal yearly operating budget. We will always have mics, DIs, single light fixtures and maybe even a video monitor or two to replace. But when it comes to the big stuff, we need to think that out in advance. And here’s why:

Over 10 years, the church needed to spend almost $300,000 to keep pace with their equipment’s end of life. Is that something that needs to be planned for? I think so.

Defining End of Life

This big can be tricky. We can’t clearly define “end of life.” Not all equipment will just drop dead at 10 years old. However, we do know that all electro-mechanical devices will begin failing at some point. We have to take some educated guesses as to when our systems will need replacing.

We also have to guess roughly how much it will cost (in today’s dollars, anyway), based on equipment I know that is roughly comparable today. Obviously, there are a ton of variables in this plan, but it’s a best guess, Mr. Sulu. 

It’s important to keep in mind that these are not budgets, they’re not completely spec’d out systems and you don’t want to be held to these numbers. Rather, it’s an estimate for planning purposes. And, you may be able to stretch some of the equipment life to even out the graph if yours looks like mine did.

Making a Plan

Once you map it out and see what your situation is, you have a basis for coming up with a plan. It’s very possible that to strictly follow an EOL plan, you would have to spend more money than the church has. So that means you have some decisions to make. You can stretch the life of the gear, but you need to know—as does leadership—that you’re running on borrowed time. You can also change the way you do services. If you have traditionally relied on a lot of moving light effects during your service, and your moving lights are beginning to fail, you either need to plan to replace them soon, or go for a different look. 

These are conversations you can have with leadership once you’re armed with information and facts. The beauty of this process is that it takes all the emotion out of it. And, you don’t look like a child constantly asking for new toys. When you present the information this way, your stock goes way up and the conversations tend to be much more civilized and productive. 

It also removes the burden from you as things start to fail. When you clearly present the problem and give leadership the responsibility of figuring out how and what to pay for, you won’t be held accountable if things start breaking. You’ve done your job—pointing out the reality of the situation, and they have to decide how to allocate funds. If you go passive-aggressive and just wait for it to break, you’ll look incompetent. Always be proactive about this. 

Well, I’m not sure this was the exhaustive, definitive guide for tech budgeting, but hopefully it’s been enough to give you some ideas on how to get started. If you have further questions, or if there are others areas I need to develop, let me know in the comments. And now, it’s time for something completely different…

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