Old Production Takes From an Old Guy

IEM Webinar: The Good, The Bad, The Rope Ladders

Dave, Jason and Mike discuss the benefits and challenges of in-ear monitors on the church stage. Though IEMs can be a great help in reducing stage volume, they can also cause some problems as well. In this lively discussion on IEMs, we talk about how to get the most from a move to IEMs and when you might want to hold off. Listen here or subscribe to the iTunes feed and receive it as a podcast.

Download this Episode (below) or Subscribe in iTunes

Church Tech Arts Webinars: IEMs

2 Comments

  1. bryankeithnelson@yahoo.com

    This is a webinar that I wished I had 8 years ago. I really appreciate the time it took for you guys to share the purpose behind IEM (in-ear-monitor systems) and how it impacts both the musician and the FOh engineer.

    If it were not for IEM, there’s no way we’d be able to operate two synchronized bands via click tracks and loops who can neither hear or see each other each week … which in turn gives us a desperately needed 200 extra seats on the weekend. Yes, they bring challenges – but the pros far outweigh.

    Musicians, listen up, these guys know what they are talking about. You’d kill to have engineers who understand what’s needed on stage and how a properly setup IEM can be a solution for many applications.

    http://verticalresonator.wordpress.com/2009/11/16/video-of-two-worship-bands-synchronized-playing-in-different-locations-at-the-same-time/

    Trust between the FOH, monitor world, and stage musicians is #1. Musicians rarely enjoy “games” played by engineers to get them to play/sing differently. Like you suggested, talking with the musicians about what’s happening (when they are sandbaggin vocally or a guitarist dramatically boosts levels with the solo) – explain what you feel is happening and what the end result might be. Phrase what you want with a “Can we try ______ and see if it works for you and gives a better overall effect?” Hopefully the musician will be kind enough to understand you took the risk to explain what was needed, to make them a partner with you, and give the best end result. and for every That relationship of trust between tech and musician is crucial.

    Great quotes/suggestions:

    1. Put an IEM (in-ear-monitor system) at FOH (front-of-house audio mixer) for the engineer to listen in and learn the IEM perspective.

    2. Just because they are a musician, it doesn’t mean they’ll be able to dial in their own monitor mix with an Aviom or Hearback.

    3. Create a blank preset channel 16 in an Aviom to get the musicians rolling (talkback, low levels of instruments, etc.). Nice starting point.

    4. Pick a trusted and nfluential musician on stage to explain IEM principles to the other musicians. Musicians need to learn from another musician the importance of subtracting from the mix. Adding is generally going to escalate the situation. A FOH engineer can say it, a monitor world guy can say it – but if another musician explains it, it’s amazing how quickly they’ll listen.

    Tip:

    1. Set an alarm on someone’s phone/clock to save settings before the end of the rehearsal.

    2. Try running http://www.virtualsoundcheck.com to give bring structure and consistency to every sound check. In less than 7 minutes…a full band can be rolling on an excellent mix. The best part – the FOH doesn’t have to say, “OK now I need this … OK that’s enough … now I need this…”

  2. bryankeithnelson@yahoo.com

    This is a webinar that I wished I had 8 years ago. I really appreciate the time it took for you guys to share the purpose behind IEM (in-ear-monitor systems) and how it impacts both the musician and the FOh engineer.

    If it were not for IEM, there’s no way we’d be able to operate two synchronized bands via click tracks and loops who can neither hear or see each other each week … which in turn gives us a desperately needed 200 extra seats on the weekend. Yes, they bring challenges – but the pros far outweigh.

    Musicians, listen up, these guys know what they are talking about. You’d kill to have engineers who understand what’s needed on stage and how a properly setup IEM can be a solution for many applications.

    http://verticalresonator.wordpress.com/2009/11/16/video-of-two-worship-bands-synchronized-playing-in-different-locations-at-the-same-time/

    Trust between the FOH, monitor world, and stage musicians is #1. Musicians rarely enjoy “games” played by engineers to get them to play/sing differently. Like you suggested, talking with the musicians about what’s happening (when they are sandbaggin vocally or a guitarist dramatically boosts levels with the solo) – explain what you feel is happening and what the end result might be. Phrase what you want with a “Can we try ______ and see if it works for you and gives a better overall effect?” Hopefully the musician will be kind enough to understand you took the risk to explain what was needed, to make them a partner with you, and give the best end result. and for every That relationship of trust between tech and musician is crucial.

    Great quotes/suggestions:

    1. Put an IEM (in-ear-monitor system) at FOH (front-of-house audio mixer) for the engineer to listen in and learn the IEM perspective.

    2. Just because they are a musician, it doesn’t mean they’ll be able to dial in their own monitor mix with an Aviom or Hearback.

    3. Create a blank preset channel 16 in an Aviom to get the musicians rolling (talkback, low levels of instruments, etc.). Nice starting point.

    4. Pick a trusted and nfluential musician on stage to explain IEM principles to the other musicians. Musicians need to learn from another musician the importance of subtracting from the mix. Adding is generally going to escalate the situation. A FOH engineer can say it, a monitor world guy can say it – but if another musician explains it, it’s amazing how quickly they’ll listen.

    Tip:

    1. Set an alarm on someone’s phone/clock to save settings before the end of the rehearsal.

    2. Try running http://www.virtualsoundcheck.com to give bring structure and consistency to every sound check. In less than 7 minutes…a full band can be rolling on an excellent mix. The best part – the FOH doesn’t have to say, “OK now I need this … OK that’s enough … now I need this…”

© 2021 ChurchTechArts

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑