Old Production Takes From an Old Guy

Month: October 2014 (Page 1 of 2)

Building Proper Gain Structure Pt. 2


Image courtesy of  Stuart Cunningham , used under  Creative Commons . 

Image courtesy of Stuart Cunningham, used under Creative Commons

Last time, we talked about why we want to have proper input gain structure. Today, we’ll talk about how to actually do it. This may not be the only way to accomplish it, but I’ve had great success with this method for over 20 years. 

Here’s how I approach the process.

Gain setting in the digital world

For each input channel, I would have the musician play their at their loudest level. I then dial up the input gain until I’m within about 8-12 dB of full scale (minus 8-12 dB on the meters). I like to leave a little room for the musician to play louder when the lights go up (they always do). Many digital boards also have a trim (or attenuation) control in addition to the input gain. I use my trim to dial the level back to where it should be in the mix with my faders at unity. Because I’ve gained my entire system properly, my main fader is sitting at unity as well, and all is right with the world. I am also using VCAs to manage groups of faders (drums, guitars, keys, BGVs, etc.) and those live at unity as well, at least to start. All of this ensures that my signal to noise ratio is optimized at the A/D stage (just after the mic pre), and my starting point for my mix is faders at unity. 

Now, if you don’t have a digital trim control on your board, you have a decision to make. You won’t likely be able to run the mic pre’s hard without having too much signal at some point, so you’ll need to dial the level back somewhere. Of course, you can always turn the fader down, but then you lose fader resolution. A better alternative would be to use a VCA to keep your fader at zero. That can get tricky, however. Take a drum kit for example: If you optimize the gain on the kick, snare and hat, chances are, the hat will be way too loud in the mix. But more than likely, you’re using a single VCA for the entire drum kit. So now what? Well, you could break the drums up into zones and use one VCA for each; kick & snare, toms, hat & overheads might work. That way you can pull back the faders at the VCA level (a VCA is really an electronic remote control of the faders), and maintain fader resolution. You could do a similar trick with groups if you have them.

If you run short of VCAs, I would suggest breaking my rule and set the input gain up so that the fader remains around unity for a proper mix. Audio is a lot about compromise, and in this case I’ll give up absolute input S/N to gain faders at unity. I have found that to be the wiser trade, especially for things like cymbals.

Gain setting in an analog world

Really, the process is much the same, though you are much less likely to have a trim control after the gain control. In that case, the same rules apply as a digital board without a trim knob. You still want to have good input level coming into the channel (at least as much as you can), then turn it down as needed later in the mixing stage. You also want to keep your faders running around unity. Make the trades where you have to.

In either the digital or analog world, what you don’t want to do is under-drive your mic pre’s and have to add a lot of gain down the road. Sure you can push a fader up for a guitar solo, but you don’t want to regularly run your input faders at +8, your groups at +10 and your main at +5 because your input gain is set too low.

The exception to the rule

Now, all of this assumes you’re running on a professional grade mixer that has a mix structure with enough headroom. If you find yourself mixing on a Mackie or Behringer (or similar music store brand), chances are you’ll run out of headroom in your mix bus very quickly. If you set input gains on a Mackie the way you should, when all those hot signals hit the mix bus, things tend to go south quickly. The busses saturate and you lose all sense of dynamics. In that case, you need to really keep an eye on your overall output level and run input gains down accordingly. This isn’t a dig on cheap mixers—you can only expect so much for what you pay for them—it’s just reality. 

That’s a quick guide to setting up your gain for an input channel. As I mentioned earlier, if you go through this whole process only to find that your overall SPL in the house system is either way too loud or way too soft, you have some work to do at the system processor or amp level. But that’s another post…

Building Proper Gain Structure Pt. 1


Image courtesy of  El Gran Dee , used under  Creative Commons.

Image courtesy of El Gran Dee, used under Creative Commons.

While I’ve written about gain structure before, I continue to run across people who don’t fully understand it. And that means one thing; I need to keep writing about it. I actually understand why many people have a limited understanding of proper gain structure. It’s not glamorous like plug-ins or digital consoles, and there is really nothing new to discuss. However, if you’ve never gotten a good handle on how to properly set gains on your console, there is no time like the present to learn.

If your gain structure is whack, no amount of EQ, plug-ins or compression will fix it. For this post, I will focus primarily on input channel gain structure (overall system gain structure is another post, but I’ll mention it briefly). 

 To Hit the Pre’s Hard Or Not?

It has often been debated whether it is better to hit the pre-amps hard then turn down at the main output, or run the mains up around unity and dial back input gain to get the SPL you want out of the system. As a general rule (there is an exception, which I’ll detail in a minute), I would argue the former is the correct (or at least better) method, and here’s why. Most pre-amps sound best when you hit them pretty hard—at least up to the point of clipping, which is too hard. By running your pre-amps hard—and by hard I mean within 6-12 dB below full-scale on a digital board, or within 6-12 dB of clipping on an analog board—you are maximizing your signal to noise ratio. Typically, preamps  just sound better when you keep the levels up. Keep in mind, that’s a general rule, your mileage may vary. Now, it’s quite possible that if you dial your input gains up so that all your pre-amps are running high, your overall system level will be too high. That’s when you would lower your main level to compensate. This method will keep the signal to noise ratio high throughout the mixing chain, and will attenuate the signal at the last possible moment. 

Goals of Proper Input Gain Structure

Before we get to setting up the gain structure, let me lay out my goals in for the process. First, I want to maximize S/N ratio. Keeping the input level high means I won’t be boosting it later, which adds noise. Second, I like to mix with my faders around unity. Mixing with faders at unity is another key ingredient to good mixing. 

The fader resolution is highest right around unity, so you can easily make small adjustments. If you try to mix with your faders at -20, a slight change in fader position might yield a 3-5 dB change rather than the 1-2 you actually desire. Finally, I want to be sending a very solid signal out of my mixer to the processors to again maximize signal to noise. 

Using All the Bits?

At one point, I believed that if we were mixing in the digital world, we wanted to try to use up as many bits as possible to keep S/N high. And that may have been true at one point, but now that even inexpensive consoles are using 24, 36, 40 and higher floating point resolution internally, we effectively have unlimited dynamic range and high S/N ratios. Modern digital consoles are very quiet and have great dynamic range. So the point of running the input gain high is really to extract the best tone out of the pre’s. 

So now that we have some understanding of the goals of the process, we need to consider how to properly set up the gain on the console. And that will be the focus of the next post.

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Don’t Skip These 3 Steps in a New Building

There are some conversations that I have over and over. Of late, conversations about building a new building have been popping back up. Of course, hundreds of things need to be considered when building a new building, but there are few themes that seem to get missed more often that not. Skipping these things ensures two things: First, you and your congregation will not be happy with the performance of the sound, lighting and/or video in the room. Second, there will remain a healthy market for companies that specialize in fixing churches that were designed and built poorly. 

With that said, here are three things you cannot skimp on when entering a building project.

Fix the Acoustics Before You Build

First, the overall acoustic signature of the room has to be correct. This is where most churches take short cuts. They let the architect design the building; which is fine except most architects really don’t understand how acoustics work. Now that I work with architects, I understand why. They don’t look at buildings the same way we do as production folks. A few are getting better at it, but they’re the ones who design churches for a living and have AVL guys on staff. 

The problem is most architects want the room to look nice and be easy to build. They never consider standing waves, comb filtering, reverberation time, reflections, and other nasty acoustical anomalies that will make it hard to get decent sound. Some argue that it can be fixed with electronics. It can’t. There is no magic black box that will suddenly cancel out the bounce off the back wall that makes it really hard for everyone in the room to hear what the pastor is saying. 

So I strongly suggest all churches have an acoustician look at the plans before they are finalized. Most of the time, it only takes a few tweaks here and there to make a huge difference in how intelligible the room will be, and most of the time the cost to build is the same or only marginally higher. Very few churches get this part right, and it’s why there’s a huge market for acoustical study and retrofit of existing buildings. Given the acoustic treatment budgets in some of our remodel projects, I can guarantee you it’s a lot more expensive to fix it later. 

Don’t Skimp on Infrastructure

The second thing to consider is infrastructure. Again, most churches don’t think of this. Audio, video, and lighting take a lot of wiring. If you leave it to the electrician to do it, you will be fighting the building forever. Especially if you are on a concrete slab. You need an easy way to get cabling from the tech booth to the stage; to speakers, to video projectors and to the dimmers. That means conduit. Conduit is cheap and easy to put in as the shell is going up. Afterward, not so much. Once you determine your needs for right now, lay out the conduits you need and make double-dog sure they get put in. Then add a few more empties just in case. And go big on the empties. Nothing is quite as frustrating as trying to figure out how to get a VGA cable down a 3/4″ conduit (unless you enjoy making up Mini-15 connectors…). Having a couple of empty 2″ conduits will make your life (or someone who comes after you) a lot easier in a year or three.

Get Your Systems Integrator Involved Early

The final thing (well, I could think of a dozen more, but these are the biggies) is to get your A/V/L systems integrator involved in the project now. Again, most churches wait until the building is up and drywall is being taped before considering who they’ll use for the A/V. Bad idea. As with the acoustician, the earlier you get the A/V guys involved, the easier, cheaper and better the final product will be. They will be able to tell you what kind of wire to have pulled while the building is open. They can work with the acoustician to get the speaker fly points set correctly. They will be on the watch to make sure a duct run doesn’t end up where you need to put a screen or projector. 

Choose your vendors carefully of course; make sure they have a proven track record of getting church design & install correct. Don’t skimp on the design and planning phase. Cut out equipment if you have to. You can always re-purpose your existing mixer and upgrade to digital later. It’s a lot harder to acoustically retrofit a poorly designed building. It’s better to start with just a few lights and add as you go than to be fighting too low of a trim height because the building wasn’t designed properly.

There is a lot to do when starting a building project. Sadly, the systems that churches rely on every single week to create powerful and engaging worship experiences are often afterthoughts at best. Don’t make that mistake. Your congregation will thank you later.

Roland

Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 3


In the previous two posts, we considered some questions that we need to ask and answer before selecting a PA. Once we have an idea of what we’re trying to accomplish, what our design criteria are and how we can implement that design, we still have a few more choices to make. I told you this wasn’t an easy process!

Powered or Unpowered?

A decade ago, an audio amplifier was big, heavy and required a lot of current to work well. Today, even powerful amplifiers can fit into small spaces and don’t weigh nearly as much. As a result, more manufacturers are opting to include them in their speaker systems. There are some significant benefits to this approach. First, the amplifiers can be exactly matched to the speakers. Since the amp is in the box, cable runs are incredibly short, which means nearly 100% of the amp’s power is deliver to the speaker, not turned into heat in the cable. Crossover points between drivers can be optimally set, and often DSP included in the box, which makes for a far more predictable system. 

The downside is that if an amp goes on a speaker that is 50 feet in the air, someone has to go up and change it. You also have to supply power to your powered speakers, which means double the number of cables running to each box. And the inclusion of amps also means the powered speakers will be slightly heavier than their unpowered brethren. This is not typically a problem, but it has to be considered. 

Which is better? Like all things in audio, that depends. Often times, powered speakers are an excellent choice as many of the tuning decisions have been optimized at the factory, which means it should take less time getting them sounding great in the field. On the other hand, if your installer wants to do something rather custom to accommodate a specific situation, sometimes the added control of separate components is better. The availability of power and space for amps also factor into the decision. 

Thankfully, there are excellent choices in both powered and unpowered varieties and it’s not uncommon to see the same speaker available in both powered and unpowered versions.

Line Array or Point Source?

Line arrays—multiple identical boxes hung close together in a vertical line—are all the rage right now. And to be sure, they solve a lot of problems in certain situations. They typically boast good pattern control, are very efficient and are easy to rig; characteristics that make them excellent choices for large venues. Nearly every large tour is using line arrays right now for those (and other) reasons. They are not the right choice for every venue, however. 

Smaller rooms (under 500) will often be better served with a more traditional point source box. In small rooms, it’s difficult to hang a long enough array to achieve good pattern control, and they get very expensive very quickly when compared to a point source system. Don’t fall into the trap of thinking that since line arrays are “new technology” they are inherently better. There has been a lot of development going on in both types, and modern point source systems can be incredibly effective when designed well.

A relatively new type of system is emerging as a great problem solver for certain rooms; the digitally steerable array. Using a larger number of small drivers and a bunch of digital signal processing (DSP), these systems can be life-savers for problematic rooms. A digitally steerable array can vary it’s coverage both vertically and horizontally to keep sound going where the people are and away from where they are not. Because they typically use a bunch of small drivers, their footprint is small making them ideal for very traditional rooms where aesthetics are a big deal.

Get a Listen

If it’s at all possible, you want to listen to the speakers before buying. Ideally, you would be able to hear them in your space. This may not always be possible, or it may not be free. You may have to spend some money to rent the speakers, or at least pay for a demo. If you’re looking at a smaller system, the local rep may have some boxes he can bring by. You may not get a whole system, but you’ll get a good idea of whether these speakers will work for you or not. Having a set of tracks of your band using virtual soundcheck is a terrific way to audition the speakers. If you can’t arrange for the speakers in your room, try to visit a venue that has them. This is less ideal, but will give you a good idea of what they sound like.

Conclusion

Which type of speaker to buy comes down not to selecting the “best” speaker, but rather the best speaker system for the room. Thankfully, the science of speaker design has evolved to a point where we can accurately predict performance before hanging boxes. Being able to try out different models inside the computer is a great aid to developing a great sounding system. What speakers you select will vary depending on the room, style of service and what environment you are trying to create. There are plenty of options out there, so with proper research and a good design, the end result will be a system that meets the needs for your church.

“Gear

Today’s post is brought to you by DiGiCo. DiGiCo audio mixing consoles deliver solutions that provide extreme flexibility, are easy to use and have an expandable infrastructure, while still providing the best possible audio quality. Visit their website to learn more.

Church Tech Weekly Episode 215: I’m a Tech Director Not a Theologian


Live from SALT 14! Where does art come from? Usually from pain. We unpack that thought and start a discussion about how our worship services may change.

More…

Today’s post is brought to you by myMix. myMix is an intuitive, easy-to-use personal monitor mixing and multi-track recording system that puts each user in control of their own mix! myMix features two line-level balanced 1/4″ TRS outputs and one 1/8″ (3.5mm) headphone output, the ability to store up to 20 named profiles on each station, 4-band fully parametric stereo output EQ recording of up to 18 tracks plus stereo on an SD card. Learn more at myMixaudio.com

Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 2


Photo courtesy of  Tim Geers

Photo courtesy of Tim Geers

This is part 2 in our series on selecting speakers. As I said last time, deciding which speakers to buy for your church can be a daunting task. It’s typically an expensive decision, and a really expensive one if you choose poorly. It’s important to not simply buy the first set you year, or decide on a system based on a magazine review. Even hearing them in another building may not be a good indicator of how they’ll do in your building. So here are some more questions to consider. 

What is the Vibe?

This goes along with the source; are we looking for quiet and contemplative or loud and energetic? Do we simply want to reinforce some acoustic sounds so they can be heard in the back of the room, or do we want to put the sound right in your face? Even in the extremes, we have options. For example, if we’re going for more of a concert feel, what genre do we wish to emulate? Some PA’s will deliver a very edgy, rock ’n’ roll sound, while others are more hi-fi. Knowing what vibe you want to create will begin to dictate the system you ultimately install. 

What is the Environment?

Churches run the gamut from acoustically live, highly reflective cathedral type rooms, to dampened and treated theatrical venues. Like everything else, the environment will effect the choice of speakers. Highly reverberant rooms will require speakers that have excellent pattern control to keep sound from bouncing off the walls, ceilings and floors. Very dead rooms will require more speakers to energize the space and overcome all the absorption.

There is also the issue of aesthetics. Many congregants would object to a modern, black flown line array in a historic cathedral. In such a room, a smaller, less visually intrusive system is required. Even in modern churches, sight lines, trim heights and other architectural features will dictate one speaker type or another. Make sure your integrator is asking these questions. 

Can We Hang ‘em High?

Some rooms make it easy to hang—or fly—speakers. In others, it’s impossible. In still others, it’s impractical or not necessary. Before you get your heart set on 600 pounds of beautiful, flown, line array, make sure the roof structure can actually support it. And yes, it’s possible your roof cannot support that much weight. In more traditional venues, wall or column mounted speakers are often the best choice as they can blend into the architecture rather easily (especially if they can be custom painted). In some smaller, multi-purpose rooms, portable speakers on sticks might be the best option. 

Can We Afford Them?

Speaker systems can range from a few hundred to a few thousand dollars for small rooms; from ten- to fifty-thousand for medium rooms and upwards of a hundred thousand to almost a million dollars for very large rooms. In those vast categories are all kinds of variations. Some well-known manufacturers are very good, and rather expensive. Other lesser-known companies can be almost as good and considerably more affordable. Not everyone needs or can afford a Mercedes; quite often, we can get by quite nicely with an Infinity or even a Nissan. 

Just be sure to buy enough PA for your room. Too many churches buy on budget and end up unhappy with the results. Build in some headroom; make sure the system can go louder than you need it to so you’re not pushing it to the edge every weekend. 

Those are some general questions and parameters you should be considering before beginning to hone in on your speaker selection. Now that we have that established, next time, we’ll consider some of the categories and sub-categories of speaker systems. 

Roland

Loudspeaker Buying Guide Pt. 1


Photo courtesy of  Larry Jacobsen

Photo courtesy of Larry Jacobsen

Buying loudspeakers is perhaps the most daunting task a church tech will face. Today we have powered and unpowered speakers; line arrays and point source boxes; flown and ground stacked; cheap and eye-watering expensive. In each of those categories, we have dozens of manufacturers with hundreds of models to choose from. While it’s not possible in the space of this article to tell you what to buy, we will attempt to guide you through the process of selecting the proper speakers for your space.

The Perfect Speaker

First, there is no perfect speaker. All speaker designs make compromises in deference to the laws of physics. The right speaker for one room might well be entirely the wrong speaker for another room. Don’t get sucked into the trap of thinking that the speakers in the church that put on that big conference are the right speakers for you. They may be, but they also may not be. 

Second, once you get beyond putting up one or two speakers in a small room, I believe there needs to be some design involved. A competent integrator should be able to model the room and show you some options based on prediction software and help narrow down your choices. Far too many churches make the mistake of just hanging some boxes in the room, pointing them wherever and hoping it sounds good. From experience, I can tell you that most of the time it doesn’t. Plan on spending at least some of your speaker budget on an actual design. You can thank me later. 

As I said, there is no “best” speaker. What you want is the right speakers for your environment. To get to that right speaker, we have to ask some questions, and determine what we are trying to accomplish. Once we know the intended result, we can begin selecting speakers that will effectively deliver the results. It’s much like buying a vehicle; you wouldn’t buy a two-seater convertible if you intend to haul around a lot of mulch. Then again, a pickup would probably not be the best choice to drive a large family to baseball practice. With that in mind, let’s ask some questions.

What is the Source?

Believe it or not, the requirements for a speaker system that will deliver primarily the spoken word and one that will engage the audience with concert-level sound are quite different. Different churches have vastly different programming styles, and the PA needs change as we consider those styles. 

In a very traditional, liturgical setting, the speaker system really just needs to deliver the frequency spectrum of the human voice evenly throughout the room and with great clarity. The volume levels don’t need to be that high (relatively speaking), so we don’t need a bunch of drivers in the air. Don’t be fooled, however; getting a system like this to sound good requires some careful design. It’s just not likely to be as expensive as a full-on modern service system.

As amplified music becomes more and more of a priority, the system needs to adjust. Some churches want concert-level audio, and the only way to get that is with a big PA. Even in smaller rooms, you’ll need to move a lot of air, and that requires a good number of full-range speakers, as well as low frequency drivers (sub woofers) to deliver the goods. Most churches fall somewhere in between those extremes and will need a system designed accordingly.

This is the first in a series of questions we have to ask when it comes to selecting speakers for a venue. Next time, we’ll delve into a little more detail.

“Gear

It May Not Be Too Loud


Photo courtesy of  Eliazar Parra Cardenas

Photo courtesy of Eliazar Parra Cardenas

It’s been a while since we’ve discussed everyone’s favorite live sound topic in the church; volume! Almost nothing will get people fired up more than trying to figure out how loud to run a service. If you ask 10 people in the congregation, you’re liable to get 11 answers. When I was a TD regularly mixing, I would get complaints from some people that it was too loud and from others that it wasn’t loud enough. And that was for the same service. The reality is, it will be almost impossible to please everyone in the congregation when it comes to volume. However, there are some things that we need to know before we even enter into the conversation. 

It May Be a Style Thing

A service mixed at 85 dBA SPL 10 second average may be too loud for someone if they don’t like Hillsong-style worship music. But that same person may have no problem with a pipe organ cranking away at 105 dBA SPL 10 second average. Some people see guitars on stage and say, “It’s too loud!” even if the guitars aren’t playing. Before you get into a heated argument about actual level, make sure you’re really talking about volume. 

It May Be a Mix Balance Thing

I’m an old guy now, but I still like music reasonably loud for worship. However, I’m not digging the current trend to make the kick and bass the lead vocal. I’ve heard several mixes—if they can be called mixes—where pretty much all I could hear (and feel) was the kick and bass. No vocals, no guitar, no keys, no anything else. And the low end was flappy and all over the place anyway. But for some reason, that’s how the guy mixed it. In all of those cases, the mix was too loud for me. It was just plain unpleasant to listen to. I really wouldn’t have mattered if it was 100 dB or 85 dB. 

I’ve also heard a few rooms where the system was tuned with so much energy in the 1-4 KHz range that it felt like an ice pick to the forehead. Again, it doesn’t really matter what level we’re talking about at that point, it’s too loud. This is where an RTA can be really helpful to see what’s going on in the room. If you see a big hump in the middle of the frequency range, you need to fix that because you’re going to get complaints. 

At that point, you have to figure out if it’s your mix or system tuning. But either way, you need to fix it.

It May Be a Acoustic Instrument Thing

Live drums are generally pretty loud. When churches put a full drum kit on a stage in a small room with all hard surfaces, the drums are going to be loud. In fact, they will probably louder than you want without even putting them in the PA. And you can’t turn them down at that point. I’m not going to go into how to solve that problem here (we’ve talked about that already—search for it), but those cymbals can be a chief source of complaints. Similarly, if you have guitar amps or bass amps on stage, they can often overpower the PA if the musicians aren’t disciplined. 

In this case, it actually is too loud. If you have to run the level of the mix higher than you ordinarily would just to make it work with the drums or guitars on stage, you have some work to do. Floor wedges can present a similar challenge. When I arrived at Coast Hills, when I turned off the main PA and measured just the stage wash, we were at about 86-88 dBA at FOH 90 feet away. At that time, our volume limit was 88 dB at FOH. I was pretty much done, so I went home. 

No, I didn’t go home, but you can see the challenge. It took a lot of energy, time and no small amount of money to fix that issue. But we did. 

The point of this article is to get you thinking about volume in a different way. It’s a much more nuanced problem than just what the Radio Shack SPL meter says. Or worse, the uncalibrated SPL app that everyone has on their phone. And by the way, the next time someone walks up, phone in hand telling you how loud it is, just ask them when the last time they calibrated their phone to an industry standard reference calibration. Then show them the calibration page and ask them where their calibration source is. That usually settles them down. 

Before you go getting into an argument about how loud it is, make sure you identify the real problem. What’s your favorite volume-related issue?

Roland

Today’s post is brought to you by Heil Sound. Established in 1966, Heil Sound Ltd. has developed many professional audio innovations over the years, and is currently a world leader in the design and manufacture of large diaphragm dynamic, professional grade microphones for live sound, broadcast and recording.

CTA Review: Ultimate Ears Reference Monitors Pt. 2


Last time around, we started looking (or listening…) to the Ultimate Ears Reference Monitors. We established that they fit well, were of high quality and sounded great for listening to music. But…

Do They Translate?

One of the questions we have to ask with a product like this is, do they translate? In other words, if I put together a mix on these IEMs, do the decisions I make listening to them translate well into other listening environments. Ideally, they would be accurate enough and give me enough information to make good decisions so that when I play a mix just about anywhere else, it will sound good. That’s kind of the point of reference speakers and these monitors. 

For the last few months, I have been working on a mix of a song we did at Coast Hills some years ago. When I started working on the mix, I had a set of M-Audio BX-5 monitors, which are not terribly accurate. I also used various headphones and IEMs to work on it. But I was never happy with the results. The mix either came up too muddy, too busy or lacking in dynamic range. It didn’t feel punchy enough, but at the same time, it felt overly processed. 

So I broke out the Reference Monitors and started over with the mix. Immediately, it became apparent what the problems were. I started making corrections and quickly forgot I was listening to IEMs. They present a terrific sound field and it was easy to get the mix wrangled into shape. Though I had spent hours on the mix prior, in just a few hours I had it rebuilt and sounding fantastic. Now, one could argue I had already done much of the hard work—selecting plug-ins, getting overall tones correct and the like—but it wasn’t until I had some accurate monitors to get it sounding good. 

I’ve also upgraded to a set of Equator Audio D-5’s in the Palatial Studio, so I was curious to see what the mix would sound like on them after I mixed it on the Reference Monitors. The result was quite good. I’m still getting used to the D-5’s, but I didn’t find much in the mix that I would change. Subsequent listening led me to the conclusion that the Reference Monitors are indeed a solid reference. 

The Bad News

If there is a downside to these IEMs, it’s the cost. They are expensive at $999, though they are not UE’s most expensive model. On the other hand, were I a recording engineer and wanted to be able to work on my mixes anywhere, they would be totally worth it. One could pay for them in just a few hours of saved studio time. Personally, I’m not sure I would have payed for them for my needs. However, now that I have them, they are pretty much the only pair I listen to. Whether or not they’re worth it for you depends on what you need to do with them. For a volunteer musician that plays once or twice a month, these are overkill. For a professional engineer, having the right tool at your disposal is pretty much priceless.  

I suppose it really depends on what you want from your monitors. If you’re looking for massive bass, these are not for you. If you want a cheap set to listen to while you work out, again, not for you. But if you are looking for highly detailed sound, plenty of accuracy, a great fit and great support, these deserve a look, er, listen. 

Sometime in the next few weeks, I’ll be heading back to UE to check out the latest in custom IEM manufacturing. I saw a brief preview of it when I did my last tour, and I can tell you it’s cool. Stay tuned!

Finally, so as not to run afoul of FTC regulations, I’m required to report to you that my super-great sounding UE Reference Monitors were provided to me by UE at not cost for the purposes of this review. There are days when it’s good to have the #1 church tech blog…

“Gear

Today’s post is brought to you by Pivitec.Pivitec redefines the Personal Monitor Mixing System by offering components that are Flexible, Precise and Expandable. Ideal for any application from Touring and Live Production to fixed installation in theaters and Houses of Worship.

Church Tech Weekly Episode 214: It’s Sunday Already?

One of the most common questions we get at CTA is how to build volunteer teams. We dig deep into that topic tonight with a guy who is really doing a great job with it. Get out the pencil and paper, you’re going to want to take notes…

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Today’s post is brought to you by myMix. myMix is an intuitive, easy-to-use personal monitor mixing and multi-track recording system that puts each user in control of their own mix! myMix features two line-level balanced 1/4″ TRS outputs and one 1/8″ (3.5mm) headphone output, the ability to store up to 20 named profiles on each station, 4-band fully parametric stereo output EQ recording of up to 18 tracks plus stereo on an SD card. Learn more at myMixaudio.com

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