How To Ask For New Gear

Does this make you want to entrust the tech team with more dollars?

Does this make you want to entrust the tech team with more dollars?

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about developing upgrade proposals. Today’s post will be similar but different. This post was inspired by a photo I received from a friend at a church where I was once on staff. I immediately started thinking about all the churches I’ve been in where the tech booth is just a disaster. Or maybe you can barely walk on stage due to the rats nest of cables and junk that is all over. Or perhaps it’s the pile of broken and haphazardly placed junk all over their storage room. It might even be all of these (it usually is…). 

Now, keep in mind, the reason I’m typically there is because the tech guys are wanting to upgrade their equipment. I have to think to myself, “Why on earth would leadership give them any money?” 

Why You Can’t Have Nice Things

You’ve heard the expression, “And this is why you can’t have nice things.” It’s usually said after you’ve broken something, or it’s pointed out that your room is a mess. Basically, it means if you don’t take care of the things you have—which are likely not as nice—you won’t be entrusted with nice things. The Bible even talks about this. Those who are faithful in the small things are entrusted with larger things. Look it up. I don’t just make these concepts up, folks. 

If your pastor walks into your tech booth every week and has to subsequently pick the Tootsie Rolls off his shoes, you’re not likely to get more money to buy a new board. Or gaff tape. Clean the booth, organize your systems and make what you have immaculate. Wring every last ounce of performance out of it and maybe even do the impossible once or twice. Then you can start talking about upgrades. 

You’re Thinking Backwards

Many tech guys come to me with tails of woe about how their church doesn’t support them in their production efforts. Their thinking is, “If the church would just spend $XX,XXX on new gear for us, we would take care of it.” The reality is, if you’re not taking care of what you have, you won’t take care of new stuff. And your pastor knows that. Especially if he has kids. 

Now before you tell me I don’t know the struggles of working in a small church that doesn’t have a big tech budget, let me remind you that I spent almost 15 years working in small (ie. sub-500 people per weekend) churches. My first church was really strapped for cash. Once we built our new building, we were having trouble paying our pastor what he was worth, let alone buying a new console (which we needed). I kept the booth immaculate, and did everything I could with what we had.

One day, one of our members came back to the booth and told me that a music store near his office was going out of business and they had some killer, fire sale deals. He said he knew how hard we worked back there and thought there might be some things that we could use. He wanted to take me shopping, and use his credit card! We met up a few days later at the store and within an hour, we had a new mixer, some band monitors and two new effects units. God provided for us, and I’m pretty sure part of the reason was that my team and I worked really hard with what we had and didn’t complain. 

Maybe You Have Another Problem

As I was thinking about this post, it occurred to me that perhaps part of the reason you can’t get your upgrades funded is that what you want to do doesn’t line up with the vision of the church. I’ve talked with tech guys at small, country churches who can’t get the church to buy moving lights, personal mixers or a new PA. I understand the frustration, but consider this: What if the church wants to stay a small country church? What if they don’t want to be North Point? Now, there’s nothing wrong with North Point, but not every church needs or wants to do production on that level—or anywhere near it? That might just be OK. 

And if you find yourself constantly frustrated by that fact, you might need to consider if you are the one that needs to change. Churches. It might be that you need to find a church that does production on a larger scale where you can contribute. I had to do this about 12 years ago. I was attending a church that had really great teaching and solid worship, but it became clear after about 6 months that there was no place for me on the tech team. That led me to another church where I was able to make a much bigger impact. 

Might be something to think about.

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