Three Things to Stop Doing in 2017

Remember last year when I told you we had some new authors coming on deck here at CTA? Well, I'm excited to introduce you to another one. Matt Lewis is the Pastor of Worship and Arts at Beachpoint Church in Huntington Beach, CA. I've known Matt for a few years now and have always been impressed with his heart for the church, worship and tech guys. A former tech guy himself, he understands what we go through, and I think he's going to bring a great perspective to this site. Welcome Matt!

I hope this post finds you well and that your Christmas and New Year’s brought you memorable times with your teams and families. Now that 2016 is behind me and 2017 stretches out in front of me, I find myself reflecting on the past year and the ways in which this year will be different. Out of that time of reflection, I was struck with the thought of how much lies ahead in 2017. There will be plenty to do, so I thought it could be good to consider the things we should stop doing that will result in leading healthy ministries. These three things aren’t necessarily easy to implement, but I believe they are game changers for each of us and will help us to continue in ministry for a long time.
Saying Yes To Everything
When was the last time you nicely said, “No, I can't do that?” No tech artist wants to utter the words that something can't be done, but your sanity may be on the line if you don't say, “No.” For some reason, technical artists get asked to do a lot; sometimes the seemingly impossible on a shoestring budget. And, the seemingly impossible gets pulled off, over and over and over again. At what cost to the technical arts team? If the cycle of saying yes to every little thing that comes your way never stops, both you and your team will burn out. What’s the solution?

  • Be honest with yourself about your and your team’s capacity
  • Adopt “No” into your vocabulary and learn to use it regularly and politely
  • It’ll feel weird at first, but keep honoring the boundaries you’ve set in place

Doing It All Yourself
When was the last time you didn’t operate a piece of equipment on the weekend? If you find yourself in the production booth, mixing week after week—and you like it so much you won't let another person step in—then something is wrong. Attempting to be the guy shouldn’t be the goal of leading a tech arts ministry. Being the guy means everyone comes to you, for everything, all the time. The culture this creates in your organization is one of the false belief that you, as the tech person, are indispensable; without you, things just wouldn't happen. What happens when you leave? Where does this leave the organization?

  • Empower people to exceed your skill level
  • Build the culture around a vision not a personality
  • Lead from the sidelines, not the field
  • Giveaway responsibilities—consider what things on your plate you can entrust to others on your team

Operating Without Systems, Standards & Processes
Do you know the how, what and why of you technical arts ministry? If the answer to these questions aren't contained in writing and accessible to your entire team, then it will be nearly impossible to onboard and train new team members, keep consistency week to week and build a culture that is healthy and ordered. It will take the time to sit down and put onto paper what is contained in your mind, but the rewards will be great. What are some practical tips for next steps?

  • Utilize Google Docs as a file sharing platform for your entire team—it’s free and simply amazing!
  • Create a weekly checklist of things that have to get done each week
  • Draw up stage plots and spreadsheet input lists templates
  • Craft “How To” docs/videos for your team as points of training and reference for your entire team
  • Provide written clarity for each role by writing up ministry role descriptions for each role on your team (similar to a job description)—you have one of those, so should people on your team
  • Come up with a clear on-boarding process for your team, providing clear steps for how to get in the game