Old Production Takes From an Old Guy

Category: Education (Page 2 of 41)

Tech Power


Image courtesy of  Oran Viriyincy

Image courtesy of Oran Viriyincy

So a funny thing happened on the way to the website…Just as I was getting ready to post the last post of 2016, I got a notice that my security certificate was invalid. Knowing that I needed to touch up my domain config and enable SSL, I decided to click those buttons. What could possibly go wrong? Well, after knocking CTA out for a few days, we’re back. And now it’s 2017! But this is still a good post, so here it is the last post of 2016, and the first post of 2017…

As I was thinking of topics to wrap up the year, I wanted something powerful, something electrifying, something high-voltage. Then it occurred to me that I’ve not done a post on technical power. And since pretty much everything we use every weekend runs on power, it’s kind of an important topic. Power is also something often overlooked during a build or remodel. Many of the problems we have with sound and video can be traced back to bad power. There’s actually a lot to this subject, and I’m not sure I can cover it all in one post. But let’s see how far we get.

Go To Ground

At some point, all power ends up at ground. After it has done its job, power goes to ground. And that’s where problems tend to crop up. I’ve seen many a church wired up with the stage power coming off one panel and the tech booth power coming from another. Electricians do that because it may be easier for them, and they really don’t understand what we do. The problem comes in when there is a different ground potential on those two circuits and we connect them together with audio wiring (or video wiring, for that matter). 

How do we connect them together? Let’s say your amps are on the stage panel, while your mixer is on the tech booth panel. Connect your mixer to the amps with a balanced audio cable. The ground (shield) on said cable connects to the chassis grounds on both the mixer and the amp. Guess where those chassis grounds connect to? The ground pin in the outlet.

Now, let’s say we have 3-4 volts on the ground leg of the stage panel and 0 on the tech booth panel. That little voltage will flow over the shield and induce hum into your signal. 

It is for this reason that when we specify tech power, we always specify dedicated, isolated ground panels. An isolated ground isolates the neutral bus from the ground bus. I won’t go into technical details here, but it goes a long way to prevent what I just described. We also always specify this IG (isolated ground) power for the audio and video equipment. Lighting gets put on its own panel. In a pinch, if budget is tight and the lighting rig is small and LED, we can pull lighting power from a general-use panel. But never from the AV panel. 

Isolation Power

We also like to isolate the incoming power from the power company. I’m a big fan of using isolation transformers in front of my AV, isolated ground panels. This de-couples the tech power from the power company power and cleans it up a lot. While an Iso transformer can cost thousands to tens of thousands of dollars, it’s really good insurance. There’s nothing worse than hum or bitrate errors in your brand-new $300,000 AV system because you tried to save $7,500 on a transformer. 

Power Segregation

It’s important to segregate your power usage in the booth and on stage. In all the venues we design, I specify AV circuits and lighting circuits in the tech booth and on stage. The AV circuits should be clearly labeled (orange outlets are good) as IG and only AV gear gets plugged in there. Any floor-based lighting fixtures (along with lighting consoles and distro gear) get plugged into the lighting circuits. 

Sequencing

We will often use either relay panels or a motorized breaker panel for turning the system on and off. We like Lyntec, but there are other brands available. Sequencing allows you to press “On” and have the entire system power up in the right order (mixer and stage racks before amps). It goes back off in the opposite order. It’s also important to have both sequenced and non-sequenced AV circuits in the tech booth. Often, you will want to leave computers or other devices like UPS’s on all the time, and you don’t want them shutting down with the sequence. Speaking of UPS…

Split Your Power Supplies

It’s a good idea to put your critical gear on a UPS (uninterruptible power supply). This battery backup will cover you forfew minutes in the event of a short power outage or blip, and will give you time to shut down gracefully for longer outages. Mixing sequencing and UPS can get tricky, however. If you put your mixer on a UPS, you can’t put it on the sequence. It has to be manually powered up and down. 

Also, if your console—or any other piece of gear—has dual power supplies, don’t put them both on a UPS! If the UPS dies mid-service, and I’ve seen and heard of it happening more than once, you lose your console. Plug one power supply into the UPS so if you lose house power, the console stays up. If you lose the UPS, the console stays up.

Surge Protection

If you live in an area where storms are prevalent or your power isn’t very stable, surge protection is very valuable. Lyntec (and others) can install transient surge protection in the panels, and while not inexpensive, it might just save your $10,000 projector. We always specify TSP for our AV circuits, and if budget permits, lighting circuits as well. You can also do local surge protection if the budget doesn’t allow for panel-based TSP, though it may not be as effective.

A Balancing Act

Budgeting for all this power is a bit of a balancing act. Doing power correctly for a mid-sized AV system can easily add $25,000-30,000 worth of electrical gear to a project. If your PA/Mixer upgrade is a pair of self-powered $1,200/ea. speakers and an X32, that’s probably overkill. But if you’re spending a couple hundred thousand dollars on the system, it’s money well-spent. The key is getting it designed properly. I’ve seen some designs that are so grossly over-done that the church probably wasted $40,000 on power gear they’ll never use. On the other hand, going to small will limit you in the future. You have to know the long-term plans for the room. I like to have at about a half-dozen empty circuits in the panel board, unless the building will be greatly expanded. Only then are more appropriate. Then again, I’m working with a church right now doing a PA upgrade, and we need 6 new circuits for the amps, DSP and wireless rack. Having open space is a good idea. 

There’s probably much more I can say about power, but I’ll stop for now. Being that this is the last post of 2016, I want to thank you for reading this year—and in years past—and hope you’ll stick around for 2017. Next year, ChurchTechArts will be 10 years old, something I never envisioned when I started. Thanks to those that have stuck around from the beginning, and to all the new readers that just joined. I have some news for 2017 that will hopefully generate some excitement, but we’ll wait until next week for that. Happy New Year!

Mike’s Mixing Axioms: #5 Timing is Everything


Photo courtesy of  David Lofink

Photo courtesy of David Lofink

Well, I bet you thought I forgot all about our final mixing axiom. I have not in fact forgotten, but have been really busy. In the past few weeks, I was part of a launch of a new church campus in Indiana, we kicked off a design process for another church in Indiana, and I took a week off to spend time with my daughter and her boyfriend who were visiting from California. In the midst of all that, writing this post took a back seat. Sorry about that! But here we are, at the final axiom. And perhaps it’s appropriate that the title is Timing is Everything.

I’m going to look at this from two completely different perspectives, both of which will make your services better. 

Time your Effects to the Song Tempo

This tip has made one of the biggest, subtle improvements to my mixes of anything I do. It’s a huge improvement because you can get really creative and layer in a bunch of great reverbs and delays which create a super-rich sonic landscape while not muddling up the mix—if it’s all in time! So often, I hear mixes that have a ton of delay and reverb in them, but because it’s not in time, it just “blurs” the sound. All those extra reflections and delays out of time make it hard to understand lyrics and can obscure instruments. However, when it’s in time, it just sounds good! 

I’ve written about this quite a lot, so I’m not going to go into great detail here. However, it’s one of those things that makes such a difference—and is so easy to do—that it’s worth mentioning again in a post about timing. 

Nail the Transitions

The other issue of timing has to do with transitions. In my view, transitions can make or break a service. Picture this; you’re in the congregation, the worship team is finishing up the last song, everyone is in a posture of worship. It’s time for the pastor to come up and pray. Except his mic is off. Suddenly the mic snaps on mid-sentence while the band abruptly cuts off. You’re immediately jolted out of worship posture to, “what just happened” posture. Bad transitions strike again.

It’s super-important that we not screw up the service by screwing up transitions. Set you console up so you can easily transition from worship to prayer without breaking anything. Maybe it’s just setting up a few VCAs to make it easy. It could be using snapshots or scenes. But whatever you have to do to make those transitions seamless, do it. 

Getting these transitions right means you need to be thinking ahead and be aware of what is going on in the service. You shouldn’t be surprised when the pastor comes up to pray. You need to be ready to make that transition, even if it happens differently than it says in Planning Center. As you approach the end of the last song in the music set, start thinking about how you’re going to go from band to whatever is next. As the video bumper is winding down, figure out the movements you need to make to get to the next thing. Think ahead, don’t wait until one element ends to begin contemplating what is next.

This was an area that I spent considerable time training my volunteers on. Virtual soundcheck is a godsend here. I would cue up a transition point and let them run it again and again until they became comfortable. You may need to practice this as well. Spend some time during the week considering how to smooth out the transitions and the service will be better for it.

So there you go; Mike’s Mixing Axioms. Hopefully this has been a good series. I’ve got lots of ideas brewing for new posts as well as some big changes around here for 2017. Stay tuned!

Elite Core

Mike’s Mixing Axioms: #4–Make Good Choices

Today we’ll be continuing our series on Mike’s Mixing Axioms. These are things that I’ve been working on and working through for the past 20 or so years of mixing. As I said earlier, this is not Gospel, and there are very likely other ways to do things. But this is what I’ve been doing and it seems to deliver consistently good results. 

We’ve already considered the first three: Keep it Simple; Basics First; Less is more. Today, we’re going to talk about choices. 

Axiom #4: Make Good Choices

When my girls were younger, when they would head out with friends, I would often call out as they left the house, “Make good choices!” I was reminding them to make choices based on who we raised them to be. Sometimes those are hard choices, but we all have to make choices.

When it comes to mixing, we also have to make choices. Sometimes they are hard choices. I’ve had to mix musicians that were—how to say this—less than good. Let’s say they had great hearts. There are times when we have to make choices as to what is heard in our PA. In fact, every time we get behind the console we have to make choices about what is in the PA. It’s up to us to make good choices. 

Damage Control

When you’re mixing a “good hearts” band, you are effectively damage control. You are going to have to do your best to present them in the best light possible, and at times that will mean turning some people down or off. The tone deaf background singer probably shouldn’t be highlighted during the service. The guitar player who refuses to tune should probably not be leading the song. Sometimes, your choices become the lesser of two evils and you have to do what you can. It’s not ideal, but as I said in It Might Not Be Your Fault, you work with what you are given.

Good Choices

The game changes when you have a good band. In that case, you still have to make choices, but they become much more creative and you have a lot more to choose from. A lot of people get tripped up when they’re mixing feeling like if it’s on stage, it needs to be heard in the mix just as loud as everything else. In those instances, you’ll hear the acoustic guitar pushed way up too loud during a big rocking song because, well, it’s on stage.

Now, I can’t tell you when to turn things up and when to turn them down. There are simply too many factors to consider. However, let me give you a simple example. Take a song that starts out somewhat mellow, builds, and then breaks down at the end. And let’s assume you have a few electric guitars and an acoustic in addition to the rest of the band. What I might do is feature the acoustic in the beginning and ending sections and the electrics in the big middle. During the big middle, you might not hear the acoustic at all unless you really listen closely. Trying to push the acoustic into the big section of the mix might well just muddy it up or make it harder to hear the vocal. 

Again, I’m not trying to give you a prescription, but rather permission. I want you to have permission to not feel like you have to hear everything all the time. Sometimes things like keys and pads are just there, filling in gaps, and you’d really only notice them if you turned them off. That’s OK! 

How do you decide what to feature? Listen to the band, they will let you know. In a well-arranged song, something will lead each section. It may be the same instrument, or it may change. Follow along with the band and mirror their choices. 

Now sometimes, you get a good band, with really good players who all want to be soloists. I’ve mixed those bands as well. In those cases, you get to choose who is leading and who is background. You’ll have to pick the instrument that makes the most sense for the song and tuck the rest behind. 

This is one of the hardest things to teach, honestly. Some people just know what choices to make. Others have to learn, and some will never get it. The best thing I can tell you is to spend a lot of time listening to music critically. Take a song you like and listen to it over and over. Map it out; figure out what you hear in each section of the song. What is prominent and what is in the background? What is the lead and what disappears? Music is a language and like any language, we can learn it—it just takes time and practice. 

This axiom is probably the most vague and I apologize for that. Like I said, it’s hard to illustrate with words. Next time, we’ll get into the last one which is much more concrete. Until then, make good choices!

Elite Core

Mike’s Mixing Axioms: #3–Less is More


Image courtesy of  theilr

Image courtesy of theilr

Well, we’re back talking about mixing again. In this series, I’m sharing with you some of the guiding principles by which I build my mixes. Like all things, these are not hard and fast rules, but more often than not, I’m doing these things each time I mix. It doesn’t matter what or where I’m mixing, this is where I start. We’ve already talked about keeping it simple, and getting the basics dialed in first. Today, we’re on to the next topic: 

Axiom #3: Less is More

You’ve heard this expression many times in the past, I’m sure. It may be hard to figure out how it applies to mixing, however. Here’s what I mean: I tend to do less to the mix, and it turns out sounding a lot better. By less I mean less EQ, less compression and less in the way obvious effects. 

If you follow any of the church sound groups on Facebook, you’ve seen the popular posts, “Guess this EQ.” Usually it’s a picture showing pretty much every band cut to -18 dB. You will probably never see that on any board I’m mixing on. In fact, if I’m boosting or cutting by more than 4 dB, it’s an odd day. And it usually means there was a problem I couldn’t solve with mic choice or placement (I don’t always get to choose the mic locker). 

You’ll also almost never see narrow cuts or boosts. I tend to use 2 octave or wider filters because I find them to be more musical—mainly because they do less damage to phase. My EQ is subtle and minimal. Less is more.

The same goes for compression. While I might use compression on most of my channels, I don’t use much of it most of the time. This is especially true for drums. My drum compression technique is to use just enough compression to smooth out minor variations in how hard the drummer hits each time. I don’t try to make every hit in the whole set the same—I want the player to be able to deliver dynamics. However, I try to smooth it out just a little so the occasional hard hit doesn’t stand out. 

Similarly, I use parallel compression on vocals so I don’t have to crush them so they stand out in the mix. If you look at my compressors, you’ll see they’re taking 2-3 dB off at most. I’m smoothing, not smashing. One of the biggest offenses I hear in mixing today is a lifeless mix that is neither hot nor cold, loud nor quiet, just blah. This is typically the result of too much compression. Just because you have compressors on each channel doesn’t mean you should turn them all on to max.

Finally, I keep the sound of my effects minimal by timing them to the song. I did an entire post on this a while back. With this technique, I can add in a lot more reverb without it sounding like the mix is swimming in it. This keeps the anti-reverb people happy, while still adding a nice sense of lush to the mix. 

How do you start with this? As I said in a previous post, start by flattening out the EQ, turn off the compressors and just mix. As you find you need to, do a little EQ here and there. Do the least amount of compression you can. Start with simple effects and work up. Let the music speak for itself, and it will almost alway sound better.

This post is brought to you by Shure Wireless. The new ULX D Dual and Quad wireless systems feature RF Cascade ports, a high density mode with significantly more simultaneous operating channels and bodypack diversity for mission critical applications. Visit their website at Shure.com.

Mike’s Mixing Axioms: #2–Basics First


Image courtesy of  Didriks

Image courtesy of Didriks

Last time, we started our series of Mike’s Mixing Axioms. We talked about my concept of keeping it simple. Today’s axiom is similar, but different. As I said last time, these are things that I do—it doesn’t mean it’s the only way to do it. However, I’ve found that over 30 years, these seems to make a lot of sense and work pretty well. Were my situation different, I might have some different axioms. But since I mix in churches, this is what I do. 

Axiom 2: Basics First

You might think that this is the same thing as keep it simple, but it’s really not. What I mean by this is that when I come into a new mixing environment—new for me, that is—I work on the basics first before I start getting complicated. What are the basics? Making sure the inputs all work and are noise free. Getting my board is laid out how I’m used to it, or as close as possible, so I don’t have to keep hunting around for channels. Dialing up the gain structure properly so all my faders fall right around unity for a good mix, while still giving me solid levels. Working with the band to get them good monitor mixes as needed, and making sure they’re happy. 

It’s a little bit like cooking; salt and pepper are basic spices. But they’re not flashy, so some people go after all sorts of special spices without getting the simple salt and pepper right. Start there, and work up.

These are all basic elements, but too often, I see them overlooked in favor of the fancy stuff. I can tell you that if you jump past the basics and try to go straight to advanced techniques, you will not end up with a good mix. For my SALT mixing class, I started off mixing a track with nothing but high pass filters and EQ on only the kick and lead vocal. And you know what? It sounded pretty good! My gain structure was good, we made good choices on our mic’s, and the band played well. I had a little extra work to do as my “compressors” were my fingers. However, after the song was done, I asked the class if they could live with that, and most said they could. Now, by the time we got done, it sounded a whole lot better. But all those extras were just that, extras. 

Have you ever had a cupcake that had fantastic icing but the cake itself was rather dry and flavorless? That is missing the basics. I once heard a story of a FOH guy who was mixing his band at a festival. They had a few minutes to sound check between sets and he spent the entire 20 minute sound check working on the toms. The show producer told them it was time to go and he had to set up everything else during the set. That went well. 

My sound check is kind of like that. I have about 20 minutes to dial the whole band in and then we start rehearsal. Now granted, I get to start from a decent place each week, not a completely new board. And I do have a rehearsal to work up the mix. But still, I don’t have a lot of time to get fancy. So I make sure I crush the basics. 

Doing the basics well means moving quickly and continuously. But that’s easy when I’m not having to adjust 14 plug-ins on my rack toms. Over time, I’m refining my show file so that I can start adding in some of the fancy extras that make it sound just a little bit better. 

Getting the basics right means you’ll get the mix to 80-85% very quickly. And to be honest, that’s good enough for most folks. Sure, we can hear the difference between 80 and 100%. But most people can’t. Get to 80% and nail it. Then tweak your way up to 90-95%. But don’t shoot for that last 10-15% before locking down the first 80.

DPA Microphones

Mike’s Mixing Axioms: #1–Keep It Simple


Image courtesy of  One Way Stock

Image courtesy of One Way Stock

As I write this, it’s a few weeks after my SALT mixing class. And I mixed at church this weekend. That means, I’m thinking about mixing. Based on the feedback from the class and the thoughts rambling around in my head, I thought I would write up a series that I’m calling my Mixing Axioms. The dictionary on my Mac defines Axiom as “a statement or proposition that is regarded as being established or accepted.” I like that. After almost 30 years of mixing, these are things that—for me anyway—are established and accepted. This is what I do. Check back here throughout the month and you will know what I know.

Axiom 1: Keep It Simple

If you’ve ready any of my posts on parallel compression, frequency splitting reverbs or automating Reaper, you might thing my mixes are anything but simple. But the reality is, aside from a few little tricks, I try to keep the mix as simple as possible. For the most part, the music that I find myself mixing does not require tons of special effects. I don’t do hip-hop or techno, so I’m not creating effects for effect’s sake. 

Whenever I mix at a new venue, one of the first things I do is start flattening out EQ’s and removing plug-ins from the signal path. As much as possible, I like to minimize the number of things I’m doing to the signal. Someday, I’ll break out a mixer and do a video of what happens to phase as we pile on all kinds of EQ and plug-ins on a channel. As phase is time, the more phase distortion we add, the more time distortion we add. As all the inputs start to get out of time with each other, the sound field becomes blurry. I know blurry is a visual term, but it’s the best way to describe it. All of those slight time mis-alignments add up to a mushy sound field. 

Now it’s true that some consoles do a better job than others of keeping everything in time. But they can only do so much. And honestly, almost every time I go in and bypass all the plug-ins, people tell me it sounds better. The less damage I do to the signal during the mixing process, the better it sounds when it comes out of the speakers. 

This goes against the popular mixing process of putting a ton of plug-ins on everything. I’m almost always asked to put a Waves Soundgrid server on every mixing console I sell. This is not a dig on Waves; they make fine stuff. But beware putting plug-ins on just because you can. Personally, I don’t use them unless I have to, and then, I don’t use more than I need to.

I also don’t make huge changes to the channels during the song. After I demonstrated a mix during my class—a mix done with nothing except high pass filters and EQ on only the kick and lead vocal—I asked what people sitting near me noticed. One guy said, “You didn’t move the faders more than a few millimeters.” He was right. For the most part, I let the band mix themselves and only did some minor highlights. If the gain structure is set up correctly, the base mix is dialed in and you’ve done a good job with mic selection, you shouldn’t need to do too much. 

Now, this is true with most good bands. I have mixed some where I’m working really hard to keep the band from completely falling apart. And I know that’s where some of you live. Later on, we’ll talk about some things you can do that will help you with that. But assuming the band is reasonably good, we should be able to—for the most part—dial them up and let it go. 

This week, consider what you’re doing in your mix. What can you simplify? What can you take out? Trim it back until you have only what is absolutely necessary. Then see what happens. 

Next time we’ll be back with another Mixing Axiom

This post is brought to you by Shure Wireless. The new ULX D Dual and Quad wireless systems feature RF Cascade ports, a high density mode with significantly more simultaneous operating channels and bodypack diversity for mission critical applications. Visit their website at Shure.com.

Timing Reverb To The Music


My tempo calculator of choice,  Audiofile Calc.

My tempo calculator of choice, Audiofile Calc.

I wrote a post about this concept a while back, but as there seems to be some renewed interest, so here we are. Also, I got to experience not doing this over the weekend and it made such a difference, I thought I would write a new post. Here’s the concept: I was listening to a Pensado’s Place podcast some years back and Dave was talking about setting his vocal delay to 1/16th or 1/32nd note relative to the tempo of the music. He said that usually works out to somewhere around 100-102 msec. I tried it, and sure enough, it sounded good. Then it occurred to me that I could do the same thing with reverb times. 

So I whipped out my handy-dandy BPM to millisecond calculator (I use Audiofile Calc for iOS), and tried it one weekend. The results were good. So I kept doing it. Here we are about four years later. 

The basic idea behind this is simple. All sounds decay naturally over time. Modern worship music is fairly percussive, meaning there is an initial impulse, a decay and then in some metered time later, another impulse. Time—for music—is broken up into measures and notes. Those notes are played over a constant time signature that keeps everything on beat. 

Have you ever heard a band where one musician can’t quite keep the beat? They’re either a little ahead or a little behind, or maybe they wander back and forth. When they’re out of time, it becomes apparently quite quickly. 

Assuming the entire band is playing in time, all the music has a common impulse and decay. It’s all in time. Now, if you take your vocal reverb and set it randomly to 2.2 seconds because that’s what the guy who trained you said you should always use, your vocal reverb tail may or may not decay in time with the rest of the music. Chances are, it’s not in time. And when it’s not in time, it stands out like the musician out of time. 

Now, what if you set your vocal reverb to decay in a whole note’s worth of time? Give it a try. What you’ll hear is not the reverb. The vocal will just sound more rich and lush. In contrast, if you pick a random, non-musical decay time, you’ll hear reverb. Some people want you to hear their carefully crafted reverbs—they spent all of sound check dialing it in, after all! But personally, I’ve found it sounds a whole lot better to not hear the reverb—until you turn it off.

What’s amazing about this technique is that you can use incredibly long reverb times without affecting the clarity of the mix. I’ve done 4, 5, even 8 second reverb times and all you hear is a rich, lush vocal. Yes, if you pay really close attention you’ll hear the reverb tail. But for the most part, because it’s decaying in time with the music, it decays with everything else. 

So if you’re playing along at home, call up your BPM to time calculator and set the tempo to your song in question. Now, look at the time for a whole note. Set your reverb time to that time, or as close as you can get if you’re using a Yamaha console. Take a listen. If you’d like to go longer, try a dotted whole note (that’s 1.5 whole notes). Or, if the song calls for it, a double-whole. If you got the tempo right, the reverb will just dissolve in time with the music and sound fantastic. Now, for fun, pick some random time between a whole and dotted-whole. Hear the difference? Suddenly, you hear the effect. Put it back and it just sounds good. 

If you don’t want to spin a bunch of virtual knobs on a phone calculator, you can download this PDF chart that I made up. It covers a pretty wide range of time signatures common to worship music and gives you the corresponding time from a thirty-second note all the way up to a double-whole. I find this faster and keep a copy in my weekend mixing bag. Give it a shot and see if you like the results.

Elite Core

It Might Not Be Your Fault

Recently, I taught a class on mixing. A four-hour class. This was particularly cool because I finally got to walk people all the way through my weekend mixing process, not just part of it. I had a ton of fun preparing for the class—which is good because it took me 40-50 hours—and learned a lot myself. 

I started the class by mixing a track with almost no EQ, compression or effects. Well, I did have high pass filters on most channels, and I put just a little reverb on the vocal. Believe it or not, it sounded pretty darn good! You want to know why? Because I’m an amazing mixer, obviously. That’s tongue-in-cheek, by the way. No, it sounded good because I was mixing some pretty great musicians who knew how to play around each other. 

It’s Not Your Fault

I’ve been to plenty of churches where the pastor or worship leader is frustrated by the “mix” and wants to know how I can help. Often, I have to say, “Well, it would help if you had musicians who knew how to tune and play their instruments.” It’s also helpful if they don’t all play the exact same line all the way through the song. 

You might have been to a larger church, or a concert and hear a mix that you thought was great and felt bad that you mixes don’t sound like that. It may not be your fault. It could just be that your band isn’t very good. A lot of small- to medium-sized churches have some wonderful people with great hearts who volunteer to play in the worship band. Unfortunately, they’re not great musicians. And often, the ones people think are “great” are only great compared to the truly awful ones that sometimes volunteer there. 

At that point, the role of the FOH engineer is damage control. You can do the best job you can, but it’s never going to sound better than the people on stage. 

You Can Only Grow So Far

I learned this first-hand. My mixing really didn’t get to the next level until I started mixing bands who were much better than I was. I had reach a point in my mixing where I could make a very mediocre band sound OK. But when I tried those techniques with a really good band, it fell flat. I had to learn and grow and figure out how to make a great band sound amazing. Last time I mixed at church I had three people—two of which I know actually know what they’re talking about—tell me the mix was really, really good. So arguably, I’ve improved over the years. 

I say that not to toot my own horn, but because I’m mixing really great musicians, my level of mixing has improved to their level. The better the bands I get to work with are, the better my mix gets. 

This is all meant to be encouraging to you. If you feel like your mixes are not where they should be, it may not be your fault. If you’re constantly being berated by your pastor or others in the room about the “sound,” take a look to see if it’s really a mix issue or a musician issue.

And I’m not trying to simply throw musicians under the bus, here. Sometimes, the engineer really is bad. I very recently heard a mix of a really good band that was so uninspiring that I left the room. That wasn’t a band issue, the but the FOH guy ruined it for me. 

The point is, the finished product will only be as good as the weakest link. Don’t be that weakest link.

DPA Microphones

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