Old Production Takes From an Old Guy

Category: Equipment (Page 1 of 33)

Upgrading


“This will take a while.” Great…

“This will take a while.” Great…

It’s that time of year again. The time of year when a young tech directors thoughts turn to…software upgrades. With the recent release of ProPresenter 7, the internets are all abuzz with discussions about upgrading software. Now, this article isn’t about ProPresenter per se. I have no experience with it and no particular thoughts about it one way or another. It’s simply a catalyst for me thinking about upgrades in general.

On the bookFace groups I follow, I often see questions about upgrading software stuff. Having done my fair share of it, I thought I would share some observations and ideas on what I consider best practices.

Not on the Weekend
The first rule for me of upgrading is to never, no not ever upgrade on the weekend. I turn off all automatic updates on all my production machines and make sure they are not even checking on Saturday or Sunday. In fact, it’s a good argument for production machines being on their own network, air-gapped to the outside worlds. Windows 10 can’t install its next group of productivity enhancing features providing unparalleled levels of productivity if it can’t talk to the servers.

You never know when an upgrade won’t work, or will break something else. The last thing you want to be doing during what was supposed to be soundcheck is tracking down new drivers and updates so the teleprompter…er…confidence monitor will work.

I personally put Wednesday as my hard stop for updates. That was the last day I would attempt software or firmware updates. If I ran out of time, I did not do it on Thursday, nor Friday. Why? Well, one time I installed firmware and it bricked the hardware. I had to have new hardware overnighted to get it working. Well, it would have been overnight except I found myself with bricked hardware on Friday afternoon. We had missed the shipping cutoff for the day and it wasn’t going out until Monday. That was an uncomfortable weekend.

If you break something on Wednesday, you have all day Thursday to get something new moving your way and there’s a good chance you can have something delivered Friday or maybe even Saturday. Now, to be fair, that rarely happens. But it only takes one time.

If it ain’t Broke…
I generally take the approach to software updates that if what I’m using isn’t broken, I don’t try to “fix” it. Over the years, I’ve had updates or “upgrades” cause more problems than they solved—especially when there weren’t problems in the first place. Sometimes it’s not even the software in question that causes the problem.

You might, for example, find that to upgrade to the latest and greatest version of software X that you need to update the OS. No problem, you think, it’s time to do that anyway. So, you update the OS and X turns out to be super snazzy. You play around with new features of X and it’s great. Then on Sunday you show up and find out that Software Y now needs to be updated, and you need it for the weekend. Worse, once you update Y, you discover the drivers for hardware Z no longer work. Three hours later, you’re finally back in business; right about the time the pastor is starting his message…

It’s even worse when you upgrade and then discover your hardware no longer works with the new software. I’ve seen this with video and audio interfaces. Or maybe the drivers simply haven’t caught up yet. This is a great way to take an entire system off line if you’re not careful.

If You Don’t Need It

I always read over the feature upgrades or bug fixes in software updates on my production machines. If there isn’t a really compelling reason to update the software or firmware, I don’t do it. Sometimes an update will fix a bug I’ve never experienced. And since I’ve never seen an update that doesn’t fix bugs introduced in the last “bug fix”, it seems each update introduces other bugs that will then be fixed in the next release. If I’m not dealing with those bugs now, I don’t want potential new ones unless there’s a feature I can really use.

For example, I’ve noticed that newer versions of Mac OS X have really jacked up wired networking. I had nothing but trouble with it using my (former) new MacBook Pro running Mojave. It’s (former) because I just sold it and went to a Lenovo laptop that cost 25% as much and actually works with Ethernet. Since much of my work revolves around connecting to hardware via Ethernet, that cool new MBP wasn’t much of an upgrade. In fact, my 2013 running High Sierra is much more reliable with Ethernet. Why High Sierra? See point #2.

You really have to ask if those new features outweigh the potential risks of breaking something that’s working. Back when I was a TD, our ProPresenter machine was 5 years old, running 4 versions back of the Mac OS and I think two version back on ProPresenter. Why? Because it worked every weekend and the new versions of all that software offered nothing compelling enough to risk changing it. In fact, I remember updating ProPresenter one week and finding a bug that really caused some significant issues. They fixed the following week, but that weekend wasn’t fun. I’m not sure I ever upgraded any of that stuff again.

Again, this is not a dig on ProPresenter in particular. There are simply too many combinations of hardware and software in the world for any developer to ensure their software is going to work without issue with all of them. Renewed Vision is generally really good at getting their software up and running again, but you have to give them a little time. And you may not have that time.

Even Hardware Upgrades are Scary

As I’m writing this out, I’m remembering a time with a client of mine that found some very interesting issues with upgrading. They were in an area that had very unstable power delivery. I believe their incoming power varied from 57 to 64 Hz or something like that. Most equipment can handle that, but it was causing problems with lip sync between the ProVideo Player/Blackmagic Ultrastudio and the switcher. As there sermon went on, the lip sync would drift, but it drifted both forward and back as the power drifted.

So, we decided to genlock the Ultrastudio. That fixed the lip sync problem. However, it introduced a really weird AM modulated digital noise into the audio signal. My client spent an inordinate (or normal, really) amount of time on the phone with Blackmagic and it was discovered that the genlock input leaks voltage to the audio output stage. This caused the amplitude modulated distortion.

The ultimate solution was to use a Radial USB audio DI to send audio into the mixer and only use the Ultrastudio for video. Now, that’s a border case that you don’t come across every day—which is one reason it took so long to solve. But it illustrates the point that upgrading one thing can have a cascading effect on other things that you hadn’t considered; and that goes for hardware as well as software.

Which is why we should approach all upgrades with care. If at all possible, have a test bed for any new upgrades and put them through their paces off line first before going live on a weekend. This is often easier with software than hardware, which is why I have the Wednesday rule.

Proceed With Caution
At the end of the day, my advice is to approach all upgrades and updates with extreme caution. With our own personal machines, it’s fun to upgrade and try new things. If we’re practicing best practices, we have backups that we can restore to if things go horribly wrong. But with mission critical production systems, at least for me, there has to be a really good reason to upgrade. Some things to think about.

CTA Reviews: DiGiCo SD12

Taking a break from my sabbatical–which is sort of odd since a sabbatical is taking a break–to post this video we shot of the DiGiCo SD12. DiGiCo was kind enough to loan me one so I could re-shoot the audio training class for SALT University. 

No doubt you know, if you’ve followed me for any length of time, that I’m a huge DiGiCo fan. I was into them before they were cool, having bought an SD8 in 2010 for Coast Hills when I was there. I have to say, the SD12 may be my new favorite desk. It’s small, powerful and very cost effective. 

The dual screen configuration is super-cool, and I’m just a huge fan of the workflow. But who cares about all this typing, let’s get to the video!

Learn more at: http://www.digico.biz/docs/products/SD12.shtml

UPDATE 7-28-17: In the video I state that all channels and busses can be mono or stereo. That is not technically correct. While any of the channels and busses can be mono or stereo, there are processing limits that prevent them from all being stereo at the same time. The SD12 currently has 72 processing channels and 36 processing busses. How you arrange them (mono or stereo) is up to you. Sorry for the confusion, the video is updated with corrected title states.

CTA Review: L-Acoustics ARCS


One of my favorite PAs to date; Northview Church in Anderson, IN.

One of my favorite PAs to date; Northview Church in Anderson, IN.

It’s been a while since I’ve done a real equipment review, and I figured it was about time. I’ve been holding off on reviewing these speakers until I’ve had experience with them in multiple venues. In the past, I’ve found that speakers can sound OK (or terrible) in a demo space, or maybe even sound good in one application. But before I can give an entire system a thumbs up, I wanted to hear it in multiple venues of varying shapes and sizes. 

Spoiler Alert

I’m a huge fan of these boxes. There, I said it. I have now designed and commissioned four ARCS systems in three different styles of rooms and they have excelled in all of them. In every case, I’ve been able to achieve incredibly even coverage throughout the venue while maintaining a high level of sound quality. It’s hard to ask for more than that. 

Let’s talk about the system components. There are three models in the ARCS series; the Wide, the Focus and the ARCS II. The design of the boxes is somewhat unique in that they can be arrayed in both horizontal and vertical arrays. They don’t become a true line array when you hang them together, instead they cover the audience areas in sections. 

The ARCS series marketed as a medium throw system, up to around 35 meters. In practice, I have found this to be pretty accurate. My last system was in a room about 80’ deep and while we covered it very well, I was gaining the top box up about as high as I could to get the SPL we desired back there. They tend to work perfectly in the 50-80’ wide by 50-70’ deep 400-600 seat venues currently popular with modern churches. 

The Wide box is a 90°x30° coverage pattern rated from 55 Hz-20 KHz with a max SPL of 135 dB. The Focus box is the same except it is based around a 15° vertical coverage pattern. The ARCS II is 60°x22.5° and will reach down to 50 Hz while delivering 140 dB SPL. While the Wide and Focus boxes are built around a 12” LF and 3” HF driver, the ARCS II has a 15” LF and 3” HF driver compliment. 

Matching Power

Like all L-Acoustics systems, the ARCS have to be driven by an L-Acoustics amplifier. We typically use the LA4x, though depending on the design, the LA8 or LA12x will work equally well. The LA4x is a 4x1000W amplifier, and each channel drives one ARCS box. Each L-Acoustic speaker series has a pre-built amp preset that works some pretty great magic on the speakers, and they require very little EQ to make them sound great. In fact, the first time I commissioned a system, the construction project was so far behind that we didn’t get time to do any tuning of the PA prior to the first service. Even with nothing but the stock presets, the mix sounded great and everyone was happy. 

I’ve found the bulk of my time in commissioning an ARCS system is spent getting the delay times set correctly and doing gain shading to get the levels consistent front to back. I usually do 1-3 small EQ filters to correct a few minor things in the boxes, then apply a global EQ for tonal shaping of the PA and that’s about it. 

Even Coverage

For me, a huge design goal of any PA is evenness of coverage. Internally, we have a design standard that shoots for ±3 dB or less of variance across the seating area in the 1-4 KHz range. Personally, I shoot for ±2 or less. With the ARCs systems, I’ve always been able to hit that mark. Here are a few traces from the last system I worked on. The pink trace is the center of the house right section in the front row. The blue trace is in the same spot, but in the back row. As you can see, overall, it’s pretty darn close. Overall SPL was within .5 dB and aside from a few acoustical anomalies (the room really needs some treatment), frequency response is very similar. 


Pink trace = front of the room; Blue trace = back of the room

Pink trace = front of the room; Blue trace = back of the room

    More than evenness, the ARCS are musical. In fact, they are some of the most musical speakers I’ve heard. Because they act more like a point source box than a line array, the phase response of the system is very coherent. L-Acoustics has spent a ton of time and money refining the porting and waveguides of all their speakers to deliver very phase coherent sound, and it shows. Even the smallest details of the music some out clearly, and the low end never overwhelms the clarity. When combined with the SB18i subs (which will likely be the subject of another post), the overall system is one that I just want to keep listening to. In fact, in every case, when I’ve been commissioning a system, I’m usually done in about an hour to hour and a half, but I keep playing tracks and walking the room for another few hours because it just sounds so darn good! I keep throwing more tracks at them and they rock it each time. 

Surprisingly Affordable

I always had in my mind that L-Acoustics was the premium-priced brand. And to be sure, the higher end line array products can get pretty pricey. But the ARCS—and in particular the wide and focus boxes we are using in most cases—are very affordable. We’ve found them to compare very favorably to systems that don’t sound nearly as good out of the box, even when the somewhat expensive amps are taken into account. 

And that brings me to the two things I assign to the negative column of the ARCS. First, you have to use the L-Acoustics amplifiers; or as they call them, amplified controllers. I once asked our rep about using another manufacturer’s amp for some front fills and he said, “Yeah, don’t even suggest that.” Now, on the positive side, the amps with the factory presets are fantastic. I wouldn’t not want to use them, I just wish they were less expensive. 

Second, when going from a focus box (typically on the top of the array) to a wide box (typically on the bottom), there is a slight gap in coverage. It’s very minimal—on the order of 2 dB or so—and would only be noticed by people listening critically while walking forward in the coverage pattern. But it is there. It’s a zone that lasts about 1-2 rows depending on chair spacing. As I said, most people sitting in those chairs aren’t going to notice. But if you play a track with a lot of HF detail, you’ll hear a little dip as you move through that zone. Otherwise, they just work.

Like all speaker systems, the ARCs aren’t right for every application, or even every budget. However, if they are a fit for the space and you have the funds, they are an excellent choice.

Tech Power


Image courtesy of  Oran Viriyincy

Image courtesy of Oran Viriyincy

So a funny thing happened on the way to the website…Just as I was getting ready to post the last post of 2016, I got a notice that my security certificate was invalid. Knowing that I needed to touch up my domain config and enable SSL, I decided to click those buttons. What could possibly go wrong? Well, after knocking CTA out for a few days, we’re back. And now it’s 2017! But this is still a good post, so here it is the last post of 2016, and the first post of 2017…

As I was thinking of topics to wrap up the year, I wanted something powerful, something electrifying, something high-voltage. Then it occurred to me that I’ve not done a post on technical power. And since pretty much everything we use every weekend runs on power, it’s kind of an important topic. Power is also something often overlooked during a build or remodel. Many of the problems we have with sound and video can be traced back to bad power. There’s actually a lot to this subject, and I’m not sure I can cover it all in one post. But let’s see how far we get.

Go To Ground

At some point, all power ends up at ground. After it has done its job, power goes to ground. And that’s where problems tend to crop up. I’ve seen many a church wired up with the stage power coming off one panel and the tech booth power coming from another. Electricians do that because it may be easier for them, and they really don’t understand what we do. The problem comes in when there is a different ground potential on those two circuits and we connect them together with audio wiring (or video wiring, for that matter). 

How do we connect them together? Let’s say your amps are on the stage panel, while your mixer is on the tech booth panel. Connect your mixer to the amps with a balanced audio cable. The ground (shield) on said cable connects to the chassis grounds on both the mixer and the amp. Guess where those chassis grounds connect to? The ground pin in the outlet.

Now, let’s say we have 3-4 volts on the ground leg of the stage panel and 0 on the tech booth panel. That little voltage will flow over the shield and induce hum into your signal. 

It is for this reason that when we specify tech power, we always specify dedicated, isolated ground panels. An isolated ground isolates the neutral bus from the ground bus. I won’t go into technical details here, but it goes a long way to prevent what I just described. We also always specify this IG (isolated ground) power for the audio and video equipment. Lighting gets put on its own panel. In a pinch, if budget is tight and the lighting rig is small and LED, we can pull lighting power from a general-use panel. But never from the AV panel. 

Isolation Power

We also like to isolate the incoming power from the power company. I’m a big fan of using isolation transformers in front of my AV, isolated ground panels. This de-couples the tech power from the power company power and cleans it up a lot. While an Iso transformer can cost thousands to tens of thousands of dollars, it’s really good insurance. There’s nothing worse than hum or bitrate errors in your brand-new $300,000 AV system because you tried to save $7,500 on a transformer. 

Power Segregation

It’s important to segregate your power usage in the booth and on stage. In all the venues we design, I specify AV circuits and lighting circuits in the tech booth and on stage. The AV circuits should be clearly labeled (orange outlets are good) as IG and only AV gear gets plugged in there. Any floor-based lighting fixtures (along with lighting consoles and distro gear) get plugged into the lighting circuits. 

Sequencing

We will often use either relay panels or a motorized breaker panel for turning the system on and off. We like Lyntec, but there are other brands available. Sequencing allows you to press “On” and have the entire system power up in the right order (mixer and stage racks before amps). It goes back off in the opposite order. It’s also important to have both sequenced and non-sequenced AV circuits in the tech booth. Often, you will want to leave computers or other devices like UPS’s on all the time, and you don’t want them shutting down with the sequence. Speaking of UPS…

Split Your Power Supplies

It’s a good idea to put your critical gear on a UPS (uninterruptible power supply). This battery backup will cover you forfew minutes in the event of a short power outage or blip, and will give you time to shut down gracefully for longer outages. Mixing sequencing and UPS can get tricky, however. If you put your mixer on a UPS, you can’t put it on the sequence. It has to be manually powered up and down. 

Also, if your console—or any other piece of gear—has dual power supplies, don’t put them both on a UPS! If the UPS dies mid-service, and I’ve seen and heard of it happening more than once, you lose your console. Plug one power supply into the UPS so if you lose house power, the console stays up. If you lose the UPS, the console stays up.

Surge Protection

If you live in an area where storms are prevalent or your power isn’t very stable, surge protection is very valuable. Lyntec (and others) can install transient surge protection in the panels, and while not inexpensive, it might just save your $10,000 projector. We always specify TSP for our AV circuits, and if budget permits, lighting circuits as well. You can also do local surge protection if the budget doesn’t allow for panel-based TSP, though it may not be as effective.

A Balancing Act

Budgeting for all this power is a bit of a balancing act. Doing power correctly for a mid-sized AV system can easily add $25,000-30,000 worth of electrical gear to a project. If your PA/Mixer upgrade is a pair of self-powered $1,200/ea. speakers and an X32, that’s probably overkill. But if you’re spending a couple hundred thousand dollars on the system, it’s money well-spent. The key is getting it designed properly. I’ve seen some designs that are so grossly over-done that the church probably wasted $40,000 on power gear they’ll never use. On the other hand, going to small will limit you in the future. You have to know the long-term plans for the room. I like to have at about a half-dozen empty circuits in the panel board, unless the building will be greatly expanded. Only then are more appropriate. Then again, I’m working with a church right now doing a PA upgrade, and we need 6 new circuits for the amps, DSP and wireless rack. Having open space is a good idea. 

There’s probably much more I can say about power, but I’ll stop for now. Being that this is the last post of 2016, I want to thank you for reading this year—and in years past—and hope you’ll stick around for 2017. Next year, ChurchTechArts will be 10 years old, something I never envisioned when I started. Thanks to those that have stuck around from the beginning, and to all the new readers that just joined. I have some news for 2017 that will hopefully generate some excitement, but we’ll wait until next week for that. Happy New Year!

How To Ask For New Gear


Does this make you want to entrust the tech team with more dollars?

Does this make you want to entrust the tech team with more dollars?

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about developing upgrade proposals. Today’s post will be similar but different. This post was inspired by a photo I received from a friend at a church where I was once on staff. I immediately started thinking about all the churches I’ve been in where the tech booth is just a disaster. Or maybe you can barely walk on stage due to the rats nest of cables and junk that is all over. Or perhaps it’s the pile of broken and haphazardly placed junk all over their storage room. It might even be all of these (it usually is…). 

Now, keep in mind, the reason I’m typically there is because the tech guys are wanting to upgrade their equipment. I have to think to myself, “Why on earth would leadership give them any money?” 

Why You Can’t Have Nice Things

You’ve heard the expression, “And this is why you can’t have nice things.” It’s usually said after you’ve broken something, or it’s pointed out that your room is a mess. Basically, it means if you don’t take care of the things you have—which are likely not as nice—you won’t be entrusted with nice things. The Bible even talks about this. Those who are faithful in the small things are entrusted with larger things. Look it up. I don’t just make these concepts up, folks. 

If your pastor walks into your tech booth every week and has to subsequently pick the Tootsie Rolls off his shoes, you’re not likely to get more money to buy a new board. Or gaff tape. Clean the booth, organize your systems and make what you have immaculate. Wring every last ounce of performance out of it and maybe even do the impossible once or twice. Then you can start talking about upgrades. 

You’re Thinking Backwards

Many tech guys come to me with tails of woe about how their church doesn’t support them in their production efforts. Their thinking is, “If the church would just spend $XX,XXX on new gear for us, we would take care of it.” The reality is, if you’re not taking care of what you have, you won’t take care of new stuff. And your pastor knows that. Especially if he has kids. 

Now before you tell me I don’t know the struggles of working in a small church that doesn’t have a big tech budget, let me remind you that I spent almost 15 years working in small (ie. sub-500 people per weekend) churches. My first church was really strapped for cash. Once we built our new building, we were having trouble paying our pastor what he was worth, let alone buying a new console (which we needed). I kept the booth immaculate, and did everything I could with what we had.

One day, one of our members came back to the booth and told me that a music store near his office was going out of business and they had some killer, fire sale deals. He said he knew how hard we worked back there and thought there might be some things that we could use. He wanted to take me shopping, and use his credit card! We met up a few days later at the store and within an hour, we had a new mixer, some band monitors and two new effects units. God provided for us, and I’m pretty sure part of the reason was that my team and I worked really hard with what we had and didn’t complain. 

Maybe You Have Another Problem

As I was thinking about this post, it occurred to me that perhaps part of the reason you can’t get your upgrades funded is that what you want to do doesn’t line up with the vision of the church. I’ve talked with tech guys at small, country churches who can’t get the church to buy moving lights, personal mixers or a new PA. I understand the frustration, but consider this: What if the church wants to stay a small country church? What if they don’t want to be North Point? Now, there’s nothing wrong with North Point, but not every church needs or wants to do production on that level—or anywhere near it? That might just be OK. 

And if you find yourself constantly frustrated by that fact, you might need to consider if you are the one that needs to change. Churches. It might be that you need to find a church that does production on a larger scale where you can contribute. I had to do this about 12 years ago. I was attending a church that had really great teaching and solid worship, but it became clear after about 6 months that there was no place for me on the tech team. That led me to another church where I was able to make a much bigger impact. 

Might be something to think about.

This post is brought to you by Shure Wireless. The new ULX D Dual and Quad wireless systems feature RF Cascade ports, a high density mode with significantly more simultaneous operating channels and bodypack diversity for mission critical applications. Visit their website at Shure.com.

Only People Last


Image courtesy of  mpclemens

Image courtesy of mpclemens

Most of you know by now that I’ve spent many years on staff at multiple churches. One thing that I’ve known, but maybe didn’t live in the reality of is that ultimately, it’s only the people that matter in our work. Now, that might come as somewhat of a surprise from me, an introvert who chose tech because I prefer working with gear rather than people. But here’s the thing: the gear will break, wear out or be replaced. Your amazing stage organization system will be replaced by someone who comes after you. It is only the impact you have in people’s lives that matter. 

This lesson was driven home for me a few weeks ago. I was on staff at a large church for a while, and when I got there, the technical systems were a disaster. I spent several years tearing it all out, cleaning it all up and replacing much of it. My team and I spent many hours organizing, cleaning and sorting through our stuff. We had everything extremely well organized, and everything had a place, and it all lived there. It was easy for just about anyone to walk into our audio storage room and find what they needed. 

The other day, a friend sent me some pictures of what it looks like today. Just 2 1/2 years after I left, it’s back to a worse disaster than it was when I got there. Ultimately, this is a failure of leadership of the church not keeping qualified personnel on staff. However, more than that, it reminded me that everything I did can just as easily be undone. Just as a forest will consume anything that’s left there, our work only remains for a short time later we leave.

The thing that encourages me in this whole discovery is that I know I made an impact in the lives of my team. I probably didn’t do as much as I could have with them, but I am confident that they were encouraged by the time we had together. Mainly I know because they have told me. More than that, I see the fruit in their lives. 

So if you are expecting your awesome setup to live forever, prepare to be disappointed. But if you pour into the people you serve with, you will make a lasting impact. Yes, I know this can be tough for introverts. I get it. I don’t do it perfectly or maybe even well. But it’s all that matters.

This post is brought to you by Shure Wireless. The new ULX D Dual and Quad wireless systems feature RF Cascade ports, a high density mode with significantly more simultaneous operating channels and bodypack diversity for mission critical applications. Visit their website at Shure.com.

CTA Reviews: DiGiCo S21

Here’s a quick video review of the DiGiCo S21 that I’ve been playing with for the last few weeks. 

This post is brought to you by Shure Wireless. The new ULX D Dual and Quad wireless systems feature RF Cascade ports, a high density mode with significantly more simultaneous operating channels and bodypack diversity for mission critical applications. Visit their website at Shure.com.

Developing Upgrade Proposals


Image courtesy of  Seiichi Kusunoki

Image courtesy of Seiichi Kusunoki

Recently, a reader reached out to ask if I would review and comment on a proposal to replace their aging analog mixer with a shiny new digital one. There were other upgrades as well. It was a well-reasoned proposal, filled with plenty of details, facts and figures. Anyone who took the time to read it would have all the information they needed to make a sound decision on whether to spend that money. My advice to him? Trash it and start over. Well, I said it nicer than that, but that’s the gist of it. I am known for my subtlety. 

No One Cares

The first point I made regarding his proposal is that no one in leadership cares about making his life easier. I say that not to be a jerk, or to criticize leadership. They just don’t care. And frankly, I’m not sure they should. When we as a TD come to them and say, “Man, doing church every week is hard! I have to re-patch all these inputs, figure out how to make everything fit, allocate my two compressors most efficiently and just try to make it all work!” their response is likely to be, “Well yes, but we’re doing church every week, right? I mean, it does work?” The answer my friends, is yes.

I once wrote a proposal similar to our dear reader’s. Only mine was two pages longer. I’m an over-achiever. It was full of well-reasoned arguments as to why we needed to change out our perfectly functional 32-channel analog desk to a 48-channel digital one. I wouldn’t have to physically re-patch inputs and outputs, we’d have more compressors, more effects, I could build scenes that would set the board up for each of the four different bands…my life would be so. Much. Easier.

Later, I polled the board and found that not one of them read it. Not one. It’s true. No one cares. 

And why should they? I didn’t care about how many couples the pastor had to counsel during the week instead of doing message prep? I didn’t care about how many sensitive artists the worship leader had to console before they would go back to playing their instrument. And I didn’t care about whether the church could meet payroll or pay for my new mixer. No one cares. Unless it affects them.

Find Out What They Care About

Years later, after spending a few years in the trenches and talking to a lot of other TDs with way more experience, I had the chance to once again submit a proposal for a console upgrade. This time, my proposal started with conversations. Lots of them. I laid the groundwork for about 6 months. Then, after thoroughly researching everything, I presented a one page proposal with the numbers. It was basically a spreadsheet table and some bullet points. 

Our leadership at that time was really keen on transitioning away from staff/contractor led services to volunteer led. My proposal would make it possible to eliminate the contractors (saving almost $50,000 a year) and allow more people to involved in the tech team. It also set us up to eliminate wedges on stage, which were a constant source of frustration for our pastor who sat in the front row. 

It was approved in a heartbeat. Why? Because I didn’t focus on what made my life easier (though the new system made my life infinitely easier). Instead, I focused on the mission and vision of the church and how this upgrade—which cost real money—would further that. Fewer contractors, more volunteers, money savings, less stage wash, more clarity. These were all values that had been shared from the top down. Not once did I mention multi-band compression or dynamic EQ or snapshots. Why? Because no one cares. 

It’s Simple Alignment

When proposing upgrades, you have to be sure that upgrade aligns with the mission and vision of the church, and every dollar you spend will further that mission. Few pastors or boards will simply give you $10,000, $20,000, $50,000 or even $5,000 to spend just to make your life a little better so you can come in 20 minutes later on Sunday. That’s not a win for them. Show them how you can get more people involved in the ministry. Show them how this saves money in the long run. Show them how their lives get easier. That is a win. And that will get funded.

Elite Core

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